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Google workplace said to be like 'Game of Thrones'

Thursday, 19 Sep 2013 | 2:46 PM ET
David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images

The Googleplex keeps getting more interesting.

(Read more: Life at the Googleplex just got a lot more complex)

According to a Business Insider report, sex scandals and political turmoil plague the company, making life at Google a lot like a modern day "Game of Thrones."

The most recent sex scandal involved Sergey Brin, Google's married co-founder, and a younger Google employee, who had previously dated another company executive. But this kind of thing at Google isn't uncommon, according to BI's report.

Google has a "permissive" way of handling relationships between employees, according to the report.

But even though Google employees can't seem to keep their hands off each other, they don't use their physical relationships to gain power within the company. No, to do that they get nasty in a back-stabbing, double-crossing, Judas Iscariot kind of way, according to the report.

Or as one source told Business Insider, employees gain power through "geo-political warfare."

Google didn't respond immediately to an email request by CNBC.com for comment.


Read the full report on Business Insider's website to get more details on just how similar Google is to the "The King of Thrones."

By CNBC's Cadie Thompson. Follow her on Twitter @CadieThompson.

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  • Matt Hunter is the senior technology editor at CNBC.com.

  • Cadie Thompson is a tech reporter for the Enterprise Team for CNBC.com.

  • Working from Los Angeles, Boorstin is CNBC's media and entertainment reporter and editor of CNBC.com's Media Money section.

  • Jon Fortt is an on-air editor. He covers the companies, start-ups, and trends that are driving innovation in the industry.

  • Lipton is CNBC's technology correspondent, working from CNBC's Silicon Valley bureau.

  • Mark is CNBC's Silicon Valley/San Francisco Bureau Chief covering technology and digital media.