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Microsoft reveals Surface Pro 2

Microsoft Vice President Panos Panay holds the Microsoft Surface 2 during a news conference in New York September 23, 2013.
Timothy Clark | AFP | Getty Images
Microsoft Vice President Panos Panay holds the Microsoft Surface 2 during a news conference in New York September 23, 2013.

Microsoft showed off its next generation Surface tablets, the Surface 2 and the Surface Pro 2, on Monday at an event in New York City.

Both tablets are slated to go on sale October 22 and will be available in 22 initial markets. The devices will be sold at Microsoft retail stores, on the company's website and at other third-party retailers.

The new Surface Pro 2 is lighter and thinner and features 75 percent longer battery life. It is 95 percent faster than all laptops on the market, the company said. It also comes in a new silver color and features a new dual-angle kickstand option. The new device will begin pricing at $899.

(Read more: Microsoft paying for Apple's next product cycle )

Microsoft Surface 2 Pro
Source: Microsoft
Microsoft Surface 2 Pro

Upgrades in the Surface 2, which is the second generation Surface RT, include a 25 percent increase in battery life, a new processor and a new silver magnesium case, which gives the device a new look. Like the Surface Pro 2, it also includes a dual-angle kickstand.

The Surface 2 is going to market cheaper than its predecessor, starting at about $449. The Surface RT hit the market at $499 when it was released.

So far, Microsoft hasn't had much success in the tablet market.

In early July, the company announced a $900 million charge to write down the value of the unsold Surface RT, which the company launched last October. At the end of July, the company--which also launched the Surface Pro in February--had only brought in about $853 million from its Surface sales.

The company only sold a little over one million units of its earlier Surface tablets, so the devices didn't really move the needle for the company's stock, said Rick Sherlund, an analyst for Nomura Securities, on CNBC's "Squawk on the Street" on Monday.

While it's likely the company will have more success with its new tablets, it's not likely the device will appeal to the mass market, he said.

'It's going to have to prove itself in the market, because cool technology really isn't quite enough. It really has to find its niche in the market," Sherlund said. "And the good news is I think the market is going to be more receptive this time than it was last time, but it's still an uphill battle for them to establish themselves in the hardware business."

The Surface tablets are more for productivity use than just consumption, so it has a stronger appeal to the business user, he said.

"if you want a tablet, you just buy an iPad. The mass market who just wants a consumption device will just buy a pure tablet." he said. "This is more for productivity use. It's a notebook that can function as a tablet, but I think you really have to appeal to the notebook, productivity buyer here, more so than a consumer who just wants a tablet."

The tech giant revealed on Monday some new accessories for the devices that give it an edge as a productivity tool, one of which is a cover that also functions as a power source. The new cover extends the battery life, while also functioning as an attachable keyboard.

It also revealed a docking station that can click in with a display port and can power two monitors at the same time.

The docking station has been expected for some time and is aimed at appealing to the enterprise customer. The new accessory, though, is only compatible with the Surface Pro and Surface Pro 2 tablets.

Microsoft also tried to appeal to non-enterprise consumers by emphasizing the size of its app store.

"Last year we launched this product with 10,000 apps. This year I stand up in front of you and there's 100,000 apps in the Windows Store right now. That's critical," said Panos Panay, who leads Microsoft's Surface team, at the event.

It's also worth noting that Microsoft's logo is not featured on the new tablets, instead it simply says "Surface" on the back.

By CNBC's Cadie Thompson. Follow her on Twitter @CadieThompson.

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