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Adobe: Customer data, source code accessed in cyber attack

Thursday, 3 Oct 2013 | 6:21 PM ET
Adobe Systems Inc. signage is displayed outside of the company's office in San Francisco, California, U.S.
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Adobe Systems Inc. signage is displayed outside of the company's office in San Francisco, California, U.S.

Adobe Systems said on Thursday it was the victim of sophisticated cyber attacks on its networks by hackers who accessed data belonging to millions of customers along with the source code to some of its popular software titles.

Chief Security Officer Brad Arkin said in a statement that the company believes the attackers accessed Adobe customer IDs and encrypted passwords and removed data relating to 2.9 million Adobe customers. That information includes customer names, encrypted payment card numbers, expiration dates and information relating to orders, he said.


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He said they also accessed the source code for several Adobe software titles including Acrobat, ColdFusion and ColdFusion Builder.

KrebsOnSecurity, a cyber security news site, reported earlier on Thursday that a week ago it found what appeared to be a massive trove of Adobe's source code on the server of hackers believed to be responsible for breaches at three major U.S. data providers.

It said it discovered the code while conducting an investigation into breaches at Dun & Bradstreet, Altegrity's Kroll Background America and Reed Elsevier's LexisNexis. Those attacks were disclosed on Sept. 25.

—By Reuters.

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