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White House: US not monitoring Merkel's calls

German Chancellor Angela Merkel (R) chats with US President Barack Obama during the state dinner in Berlin on June 19, 2013.
Jewel Samad | AFP | Getty Images
German Chancellor Angela Merkel (R) chats with US President Barack Obama during the state dinner in Berlin on June 19, 2013.

The White House says President Barack Obama has assured German Chancellor Angela Merkel that the U.S. isn't listening in on her phone calls.

White House spokesman Jay Carney says Obama and Merkel spoke by phone on Wednesday. Germany says Merkel initiated the call after receiving information that U.S.intelligence may have targeted her mobile phone. Merkel's spokesman says the chancellor told Obama that if true, it would be unacceptable.

(Read more: Secret US spy budget: $52.6 billion and counting)

But Carney says, "The United States is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor."

Carney says the U.S.is examining Germany's concerns as part of an ongoing review of how the U.S.gathers intelligence. The White House has cited that review in responding to similar spying concerns from France and other U.S. allies.

—By the Associated Press.

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