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Mega Millions rule changes boost Friday jackpot to $230 million

With the line stretching around the block, hundreds of people waited for over two hours to buy Mega Millions lottery tickets.
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With the line stretching around the block, hundreds of people waited for over two hours to buy Mega Millions lottery tickets.

Mega Millions rule changes aimed at creating bigger and faster-growing jackpots boosted the top prize for Friday's draw to an estimated $230 million, the lottery said.

If the winner chooses to take a cash prize instead of an annuity, it would amount to $125 million, according to the Mega Millions website.

(Read more: What to do when you win the lottery)

The rule changes went into effect on Oct. 22 and since no one matched all the numbers drawn on Tuesday, the Nov. 29 jackpot is still growing.

The largest jackpot in history stands at $656 million and was won in the Mega Millions lottery in March 2012. The prize was split among winners in Maryland, Kansas, and Illinois.

(Read more: $16 million lottery ticket unclaimed in Florida)

By Reuters

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