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Dutch prostitutes demand same pension perks as footballers

Wednesday, 18 Dec 2013 | 4:14 AM ET

Dutch prostitutes are demanding the same retirement tax benefits as professional footballers because of the "hard physical work" they do, according to news reports.

The campaign to secure better retirement rights is being run by Freya, a company that wants to run a number of brothels in the central Dutch city of Utrecht.

Wil Post, a lawyer for Freya told Dutch newspaper Volkskrant on Tuesday that "Footballers and prostitutes both do a difficult physical job that they cannot do their whole life. Therefore, they would like to be able to save as much as they can."

(Read more: Dirty money: The business of high-end prostitution)

Andreas Rentz | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Prostitution has been legal and regulated in the Netherlands since 2000, provided that there is no coercion, with businesses like Freya offering prostitutes, who qualify for unemployment benefits and a state pension in the Netherlands, a contract and salary.

(Read more: From Busts to Boom: Strip clubs say business is thriving)

"Men prefer young women: there always comes an age when prostitutes no longer get any work," the lawyer told the AFP news agency, which reported Post as saying "it can take a prostitute more than 10 years to stop working because she's trapped as she can't save money."

(Read more: Zurich 'sex boxes'hailed a success)

Post has asked the Dutch tax authorities for Freya's employees to enjoy the same pension perks as footballers who can put up to 5,000 euros (almost $7,000) a month into a tax-free pension pot.

So far, the Dutch authorities have refused to comment on the request, Volkskrant and AFP said.

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