GO
Loading...

Enter multiple symbols separated by commas

US judge says NSA phone data program is lawful

A federal judge has concluded that the National Security Agency's sweeping collection of telephone data is lawful, rejecting a challenge by the American Civil Liberties Union to the program.

U.S. District Judge William Pauley's decision Friday diverges from a Dec. 16 ruling by U.S. District Judge Richard Leon in Washington, D.C., who said the "almost Orwellian'' program was likely unconstitutional.

(Read more: Hail Edward Snowden, Public Servant: Economist)

David De Lossy | Photodisc | Getty Images

The program's existence had first been disclosed by Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor whose leaks have detailed the breadth of U.S. electronic surveillance and sparked a debate over how much leeway to give the government in protecting Americans from terrorism.

In a 54-page decision, Pauley said the program "vacuums up information about virtually every telephone call to, from, or within the United States.''

(Read more: NSA may have penetrated Internet cable links)

But the Manhattan federal judge said the program's constitutionality "is ultimately a question of reasonableness,'' and that there was no evidence that the government had used "bulk telephony metadata'' for any reason other than to investigate and disrupt terrorist attacks.

"Technology allowed al Qaeda to operate decentralized and plot international terrorist attacks remotely,'' Pauley wrote. "The bulk telephony metadata collection program represents the government's counter-punch.''

The judge denied the ACLU's motion for a preliminary injunction and granted a government motion to dismiss the case.

President Barack Obama has defended the surveillance program, but indicated a willingness to consider constraints.

The ACLU had no immediate comment. The White House was not immediately available for comment. A Justice Department spokesman said the department is pleased with the decision.

Rep. Peter King, chairman of the House Homeland Security Subcommittee on Counterintelligence and Terrorism, in a statement said Pauley's decision "preserves a vital weapon for the United States in our war against international terrorism.''

The case is American Civil Liberties Union et al v. Clapper et al, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York, No. 13-03994.

—By Reuters

Contact U.S. News

  • CNBC NEWSLETTERS

    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    Please choose a subscription

    Please enter a valid email address
    To learn more about how we use your information,
    please read our Privacy Policy.

Don't Miss

U.S. Video

  • Hero miles for military members: Real estate magnate's plea

    Chairman of the Fisher House Foundation, Ken Fisher, discusses the Hero Miles program with CNBC's Dina Gusovsky. During Military Appreciation Month, Fisher is asking every traveler to donate 1,000 of their miles to replenish the Hero Miles programs that is in danger of running out.

  • Cramer shuts down this market's haters

    "Mad Money" host Jim Cramer on why this market can't stop, won't stop.

  • From the battlefield to the boardroom

    Your Grateful Nation is dedicated to helping Special Forces veterans enter the corporate world and Knot Standard provides complimentary suits to vets. Mad Money's Jim Cramer spoke with Rob Clapper, Your Grateful executive director; John Ballay, Knot Standard co-founder and president; Tej Gill, retired U.S. Navy Seal; and Darren McB, active duty U.S. Navy Seal.