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Exec leaves her publishing job—for the boxing ring

Mary Hanan and Joanna Weinstein
Friday, 17 Jan 2014 | 12:47 PM ET
Exec leaves publishing job for the boxing ring
Friday, 17 Jan 2014 | 10:00 AM ET
Teresa Scott was a creative director for a publishing company. Then she discovered boxing. She loved the sport but found the gyms to be intimidating for women. So she left her secure job to start her own company, Women's World of Boxing, with a mission to make the sport more accessible to ladies.

Women's boxing was illegal in most countries for much of the 20th century and wasn't accepted in the Olympic Games until 2012.

So why would Teresa Scott think of giving up her cushy publishing gig for a punching bag?

"I experienced a complete, just total mind-body-spiritual transformation through the sport," Scott, who began boxing in 2007, told CNBC.

At 35, the creative director was too old to compete, but she saw a need for female boxing trainers and gyms that encouraged and supported women getting into the ring. She began by teaching clients on the side and in 2012 quit her day job to devote all her time and energy to her company, Women's World of Boxing.

Read more about Scott's makeover below, part of CNBC's "Escaping the Cube."

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