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Wearable tech: Fashion that looks good and reads your mind

From Google Glass to health-tracking wristbands, it's no secret wearable tech is on the rise. But just how far can technology enthusiasts and fashion designers see into the future?

The Wearable Tech Fashion Show hoped to answer just that. The event, which took place this week in Manhattan as part of Social Media Week, brought together fashion designers, tech experts and several hundred intrigued guests.

A model wears a suit based off a 3-D body scan at the Wearable Tech Fashion Show during Social Media Week.
Olivia C | TechInMotion
A model wears a suit based off a 3-D body scan at the Wearable Tech Fashion Show during Social Media Week.

Acustom Apparel

Acustom Apparel dubs itself as not being your grandfather's tailor. The startup, which recently opened up a retail store in Manhattan, uses a 3-D body scanner to customize clothes, which it promises will give you a better fit.

CEO and Co-founder Jamal Motlagh came up with the idea while he was a student at Harvard Business School. "I was frustrated with the shopping process for products like jeans and wanted to make a custom denim that fit but wasn't $1,000," he told CNBC.

(Read more: Wearable smart bands set for 350% growth in 2014)

Acustom's weekender look, pictured above, features a blue-and-red gingham shirt, an indigo Italian tweed jacket accented with pops of purple, and a pair of 12-ounce raw denim jeans. Everything's custom fit and unique to the model—even the bespoke jeans.

A model sports an LED umbrella at the Wearable Tech Fashion Show during Social Media Week.
Olivia C | TechInMotion
A model sports an LED umbrella at the Wearable Tech Fashion Show during Social Media Week.

Geisha Teku

Here's one way to light up spirits on a rainy day.

Geisha Teku incorporates LED's into clothing and products like umbrellas. The FLORAbrella is an umbrella inspired by the 1982 sci-fi flick "Blade Runner." The product uses 144 LED's to display three different color patterns. Through its color sensor system, the company says the lights will match to your outfit.

A model wears a shoulder bag that can be tracked by your phone at the Wearable Tech Fashion Show during Social Media Week.
Olivia C | TechInMotion
A model wears a shoulder bag that can be tracked by your phone at the Wearable Tech Fashion Show during Social Media Week.

Asher Levine

Inspired by science, technology and fashion, Asher Levine created his company to merge the three together in his products. After launching 3-D printed sunglasses in 2012, he set his eyes on a shoulder bag.

The Grenade Bag integrates unconventional materials such as a neoprene compound with Bluetooth technology. The bag links to a user's smartphone, so it can be tracked at all times in case it goes missing.

(Read more: FitBit recalls, ceases making 'Force' wristband)

This was Levine's first fashion show. "I was able to connect with people one-on-one, show them the technology, and receive immediate feedback," he told CNBC. "I want more people to touch my bags; it will help me make better products in the future."

A model shows off her 3-D printed nails at the Wearable Tech Fashion Show during Social Media Week.
Olivia C | TechInMotion
A model shows off her 3-D printed nails at the Wearable Tech Fashion Show during Social Media Week.

The Laser Girls

The nails of the future may just come in 3-D. The Laser Girls is a company created to sell 3-D printed nails. The company said it is inspired by fashion prints, science fiction, robots and geometry.

A model shows off Augmate, a digital eyewear platform for Google glass at the Wearable Tech Fashion Show during Social Media Week.
Olivia C | TechInMotion
A model shows off Augmate, a digital eyewear platform for Google glass at the Wearable Tech Fashion Show during Social Media Week.

Augmate

Augmate hopes to create customized digital applications for your wearable eyewear.

Using cloud-based digital platforms, the company hopes to make it easier for businesses that want to empower their work force with tools that can increase productivity and efficiency. For instance, the software will plug into companies' existing enterprise back-end services, and allow workers to access information and tools hands-free.

A model wears a knitted, 3-D printed brain sensor at the Wearable Tech Fashion Show during Social Media Week.
Olivia C | TechInMotion
A model wears a knitted, 3-D printed brain sensor at the Wearable Tech Fashion Show during Social Media Week.

Wearing your heart on your sleeve, really

Sensoree's goal is to craft wearable technology that promotes "externalized intimacy"—in other words, wearing your feelings on your clothes.

The company works with futuristic fabrics made from sustainable materials that use sensitive technologies. With this technology, the startup explores the Sensory Computer Interface, a tool that allows communication between the person and the machine.

(Read more: Future Fashion: 10 wearable tech trends to watch)

The "Neurotiq," pictured above, is a knitted, 3-D-printed EEG brain sensor that maps thoughts and exhibits brain states with color. Sponsored by Emotiv Epoc and printed by Formlabs, the piece has 14 sensors that read brain activity and it exhibits 14 light points. The design claims to show brain activity and location, which matches to a corresponding of brain state.

For instance, a meditative state will display as orange. Beta, or a state of mind with high concentration and focus, is associated with green, while a multi-sensory brain state is a combination of blue, purple and red.

By CNBC's Uptin Saiidi. Follow him on Twitter @Uptin.

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