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Twitter tests tweak of iconic 'Retweet' button

Chris Ratcliffe | Bloomberg | Getty Images

In a move that has angered some Twitter users, the social media service is toying with the idea of rebranding its iconic 'Retweet' button with a Facebook-like 'Share' button.

CNBC discovered late Wednesday night that Twitter's mobile apps have replaced the word "Retweet" with "Share" and "Share with followers" for some users, possibly in an attempt to better explain its service to newcomers. "Quote Tweet" has also been tweaked to "First add comment" and "Add comment and share." In both experiments, new Twitter users would be less likely to scratch their heads trying to understand what exactly a "retweet" is.

But the change has angered regular users, who feel Twitter has taken a page from a social media rival.

"You're starting to look a lot like Facebook," posted @daehekoorb from Kansas City. "This isn't Facebook, ok, " tweeted @jhoranmichael, a member of the service since January 2013. "I just want to retweet, not share. I hate sharing."

Read More140 things you don't know about Twitter

It should be noted that the actual function of the button hasn't changed—pushing the newly named button will have the same effect—but users of the platform appear to be irritated. And it could be for good reason: Twitter didn't create retweets, replies, hashtags, a mobile app or social ads—they were created by users and developers in its ecosystem. The social media service changing the name users invented and have grown to love has clearly hit a soft spot.

Twitter didn't immediately respond to comment on the change, which could be only impacting 1% of users. CEO Dick Costolo has said developers within the company have permission to release experiments on a small subset of users without any approvals.

Twitter also announced Wednesday that users can now tag photos and upload up to four photos in a single tweet.

—By CNBC's Eli Langer. Follow him on Twitter at @EliLanger.

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