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Why Google Glass may not be ready for prime time

For one day only, Google is giving the general public a chance to buy Google Glass, but the price may be too steep for the average consumer.

For $1,500, "Explorer" versions of Google Glass were made available online to U.S. consumers as of 9 a.m. Eastern Time on Tuesday.

An attendee wears Google Glass as he watches the opening keynote at the Google I/O developers conference at the Moscone Center on May 15, 2013 in San Francisco, California.
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An attendee wears Google Glass as he watches the opening keynote at the Google I/O developers conference at the Moscone Center on May 15, 2013 in San Francisco, California.

"If anyone wants to dish out $1,500, they're probably so excited about the technology that it'll be good publicity for them," said CNET Senior Editor Bridget Carey.

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But the high price and limited availability of Google Glass could be an indicator that the device isn't really ready for the general public, Carey said.

"This isn't really for consumers. It's still in its early days. It's not exactly perfected yet," Carey said.

Even after its limited release, Google has been trying to combat the perception that Google Glass users are invading people's privacy, Carey noted.

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Google is also working on wearable devices that may seem less invasive: smart watches. Both Motorola and LG have developed smart watches running on Google's Android Wear software, but Carey expects Google to come out with its own branded smart watch in the near future as well.

—By CNBC's Althea Chang.