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GM apologizes for recall notices to victims’ families

Jeff Kowalsky | Bloomberg | Getty Images

General Motors has apologized to the families of accident victims who have been asked to bring in cars to replace defective ignition switches.

GM has recalled 2.6 million vehicles to replace a defective switch that has been linked to 13 fatalities. Some families who lost loved ones in fatal crashes have complained that the auto firm should not have sent them notices to bring in cars for repairs.

"We are deeply sorry to those families who received a recall notice," GM Spokesman Greg Martin said in a statement to CNBC late Tuesday.

Martin said that given the number of vehicles being recalled, GM was trying to move as quickly as possible to issue the recall notices.

He told CNBC that it was conceivable, although regrettable, that some notices could have gone to families of victims given the size of the recall and the speed with which the automaker moved to notify vehicle owners.

Martin said he did not have a specific explanation for how this happened.


Questions? Comments? BehindTheWheel@cnbc.com.

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