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2014 World Cup is blazing through power

You wouldn't want to be the one paying the World Cup's energy bill.

Enoh Eyong of Cameroon challenges Jose Juan Vazquez of Mexico in the first half during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Group A match between Mexico and Cameroon at Estadio das Dunas on June 13, 2014 in Natal, Brazil.
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Enoh Eyong of Cameroon challenges Jose Juan Vazquez of Mexico in the first half during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Group A match between Mexico and Cameroon at Estadio das Dunas on June 13, 2014 in Natal, Brazil.

In an analysis done by Oilprice.com, the energy site breaks down the amount of energy that will be used to put on the 2014 World Cup now being played in Brazil. In addition to being the most-watched Cup in history, it's also expected to require more raw power than any tournament in history.

As Oilprice puts it: "The 2014 World Cup tournament will burn through enough energy before it's over to fuel almost every one of the 260 million cars and trucks in the United States for an entire day, or the equivalent of what 560,000 cars use in a year."

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