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N. Korea threatens 'merciless retaliation' over movie

Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg attend the photocall of the movie 'The Interview' on June 18, 2014 in Barcelona, Spain.
Xavi Torrent | WireImage | Getty Images
Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg attend the photocall of the movie 'The Interview' on June 18, 2014 in Barcelona, Spain.

North Korea's take on an upcoming American comedy about a plot to assassinate leader Kim Jong Un: Release this movie and face "merciless" retaliation.

An unidentified spokesman for North Korea's Foreign Ministry on Wednesday said in state media that if the U.S. government doesn't block the release of the movie, it would be considered an "act of war."

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"The Interview" stars Seth Rogen and James Franco as a producer and talk-show host who land an interview with the North Korean dictator and are then asked by the CIA to assassinate him.

With no independent press of its own, North Korea often holds foreign governments responsible for the content of their media. Pyongyang regularly warns Seoul to prevent its press from mocking its leadership.

--By AP

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