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Bond holder slams Argentina's 'broken promise'

Axel Kicillof, right,  Argentina's minister of economy, speaks at the United Nations  with Hector Timerman, Argentina's minister of foreign relations, in New York June 25, 2014.
Reuters
Axel Kicillof, right, Argentina's minister of economy, speaks at the United Nations with Hector Timerman, Argentina's minister of foreign relations, in New York June 25, 2014.

Argentina hasn't been serious about negotiating a solution to its debt crisis with its hedge fund creditors, according to Elliott Management.

"Argentina's professed willingness to negotiate with its creditors has proven to be just another broken promise. NML is at the table, ready to talk, but Argentina has refused to negotiate any aspect of this dispute," Jay Newman, senior portfolio manager at Elliott, said in a statement Monday (NML is a unit of the firm).

"There are no negotiations underway, there have been no negotiations, and Argentina refuses to commit to negotiations in the future. Argentina's government has chosen to put the country on the brink of default. We sincerely hope it reconsiders this dead-end path."

Argentina was due Monday to make a new round of payments on the restructured bonds that most holders of its debt agreed to after a default in 2001. Elliott and others are so-called holdouts hoping for payment closer to the value of the original bonds. A New York court has ordered Argentina to pay the hold-out creditors at the same time as holders of the new bonds, a decision the U.S. Supreme Court recently said it would not revisit.

Read MoreU.S. judge says Argentine debt payment illegal, should be returned

Carmine Boccuzzi Jr., a lawyer for Argentina at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton, declined to comment on the Elliott statement. On Friday, Boccuzzi said in court that "it's obvious that discussions have to happen" but also asked Judge Thomas Griesa for more time.

The judge expressed his frustration with Argentina for depositing hundreds of millions of dollars in a New York bank, apparently to pay holders of the restructured bonds. "This payment cannot be made, and anybody who attempts to make it will be in contempt of court by the express terms of this order," Griesa said in court Friday.

Read MoreArgentina 'running out of time' in bond fight

Griesa again called on the parties to negotiate a solution with Paul Singer's Elliott and other holdouts. They have until July 30 to do so even if the payments due Monday are missed, thanks to a grace period. If the matter isn't resolved, Argentina will default on its debt.

Aurelius Capital, one of the other hedge fund firms battling Argentina, said recently that it never believed the country was serious about negotiating.

"It does not matter what Aurelius would accept at next week's settlement meeting, because we do not believe Argentina has any intention of having that meeting," Mark Brodsky, chairman of Aurelius, told CNBC.com on June 20.

Read MoreArgentina on the precipice? Maybe, says S&P

By CNBC's Lawrence Delevingne

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