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Schools pay Hillary $200K to speak as costs rise

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton addresses students and faculty members at Georgetown University December 14, 2009 in Washington, DC. Clinton spoke about linking human rights to democracy and economic development, and taking an approach of 'principled pragmatism'.
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Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton addresses students and faculty members at Georgetown University December 14, 2009 in Washington, DC. Clinton spoke about linking human rights to democracy and economic development, and taking an approach of 'principled pragmatism'.

Hillary Clinton continues to rake in big payouts from speaking engagements, and now universities are coming under fire for paying her asking price while hitting students with even more costs.

At least eight universities, four of which are public, have shelled out hundreds of thousands of dollars for Clinton to speak on their campuses in the past year, The Washington Post reported. As tuition increases and budgets shrink at many schools across the U.S., some students have spoken out against what they call a waste of funds.

Read MoreHillary's money problem: How she made it

Schools including the University of Connecticut, the University of California at Los Angeles, and the University of Nevada at Las Vegas agreed to pay more than $225,000 for the former Secretary of State to speak, the Post wrote.

Read MoreHillary slams Obama: Book

UNLV, which has agreed to pay $225,000 to have Clinton speak in October amid plans to raise tuition by 17 percent over four years, has seen backlash from its student government, which wrote Clinton a letter asking her to return the payment to the school. UNLV's student body president Elias Benjelloun told the Post students are "outraged" by the "reckless spending."

Some members of the Democratic Party have made college affordability a larger part of their agenda, and the backlash comes as Clinton may seek the Democratic nomination for president in 2016. Read the Post's full story here.

— By CNBC staff

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