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Downward dog your way to thousands of new clients

The Julie Wilcox Method is an online, subscription-based program that integrates yoga, fitness and food.

Owner and namesake Julie Wilcox founded it in January after eight years as a yoga instructor. It hasn't been in business long enough to be profitable, but she hoped to change that by signing up large companies and their employees.


"My biggest hurdle right now is to land some of the bigger fish, some of the bigger companies with thousands and thousands of clients," she said. "I haven't nailed those yet."

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Marcus Lemonis of CNBC's "The Profit" said that in order for her to land these kinds of accounts, she would have to make some major sacrifices.

"The first thing I would do is find one or two companies, and I would make it so affordable to them, just to get somebody in the till," he said. "It's going to be painful for you, because you're going to feel like, 'I'm worth more than this.' I think you have to get that out of your mind and say, 'I'm just getting my foot in the door.'"

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He suggested loosening up prospective clients by getting them onto the yoga mat to try out some basic poses.

"Having them laugh, having them take their shoes and their socks off is going to break that ice," he said.

Finally, he suggested complementing her subscription business with a flagship location to help build a following.

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"I'd want to have an area where I can do my fitness, my yoga and my cooking pillar, and do live-streaming things where you can log on and feel like you're part of it virtually," he said. "I'd like to see all of those methods live streamed on the Internet, so that someone in Iowa can actually log on and take a class."

Wilcox took Lemonis' advice to heart. Since the two of them met in June, she has entered into negotiations with a major media company and two hotel chains.

Follow The Profit's Marcus Lemonis on Twitter: @marcuslemonis

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