GO
Loading...

We have to be ready for diseases like Ebola: Cleveland Clinic CEO

Infectious diseases like Ebola are going to affect the U.S. thanks to the fact that we have global health care, but right now there is no evidence the virus is going to spread, the CEO of the Cleveland Clinic told CNBC on Wednesday.

"Much as we have a global economy, we have a global health care as well. SARS, for example, is something that is going to affect us as Ebola will as well. We have to be ready for these things," Toby Cosgrove said in an interview with "Power Lunch."

Read MoreEbola fears reach US shores: Hype or real threat?

That said, Ebola is spread by direct contact, particularly with fluids, and he doesn't see evidence that health-care officials are concerned it is going to spread in the U.S.

A nurse wears protective clothing as he demonstrates the facilities in place at the Royal Free Hospital in north London on August 6, 2014, in preparation for a patient testing positive for the Ebola virus.
Leon Neal | AFP | Getty Images
A nurse wears protective clothing as he demonstrates the facilities in place at the Royal Free Hospital in north London on August 6, 2014, in preparation for a patient testing positive for the Ebola virus.

"They're being very, very careful at Emory" [University Hospital]," where two Americans infected with the disease are being treated.

"They have an organization that's specifically designed to look after these highly infectious diseases," Cosgrove said. "The CDC has done a terrific job in monitoring this disease."

Read MoreEbola treatment tried on Americans uses old idea

The two American aid workers were flown in from West Africa, where the disease has killed nearly 900 people over the past five months.

In this era of global transportation, measures must be taken to ensure the disease doesn't spread, Cosgrove added. Ebola burns out with quarantine, so the disease must be contained over a period of time.

Read MoreEbola, Russia may hit air travel demand hard: IATA

"Eventually we'll have to learn to deal with infectious disease in terms of cure and hopefully immunization that will prevent these, but we're going to see more and more of these diseases," he said.

—By CNBC's Michelle Fox

Contact Health Care

  • CNBC NEWSLETTERS

    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    To learn more about how we use your information,
    please read our Privacy Policy.
    › Learn More