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Wal-Mart workers lash out over 'silly' dress code changes

A Walmart employee checks prices on merchandise before the opening of a new store in Washington.
Bill O'Leary | The Washington Post | Getty Images
A Walmart employee checks prices on merchandise before the opening of a new store in Washington.

Several Wal-Mart employees are up in arms following the company's decision to change its dress code from a plain blue shirt and khakis to one that requires a collared shirt and a vest.

According to Gawker, the discount retailer issued a statement on its internal website last month that starting Sept. 29, store associates can no longer show up to work without a collar. Although the company will pay for the required vest, employees are expected to foot the bill for the new shirts.

According to Wal-Mart's corporate website, employees' average full-time hourly wage is $12.92.

"With all due respect to the company, this is more of a financial burden to our family since this is our only source of income with my wife and two kids," one employee responded on the company's internal site. "We can hardly afford to live on my income now with us having to pay for a new uniform (aside from the vest). It's silly."

"When will you admit you and the big fish at walmart were wrong and scrap this busy work project that you and others are using to justify your big paychecks?" another employee wrote.

A Wal-Mart spokesperson told CNBC, "We always want to hear feedback from our associates. Some are raising concerns and some are excited about the update. They think it will help them serve customers even better by being more readily identifiable."

The spokesperson added that now employees can now wear khakis or black pants, or a blue or white collared shirt, so "they now have more options."

The company declined to provide a copy of the dress code.

—By CNBC staff

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