GO
Loading...

Bank of England’s next task? Ice bucket challenge

For weeks, celebrities have been embracing the charity ice bucket challenge – and now the stunt has arrived at the Bank of England (BoE).

Former BoE Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) member Andrew Sentence told CNBC on Thursday that he had taken up the challenge himself, and nominated the entire rate-setting committee to do the same.

In response, Sentence said just one member of the MPC had agreed to do the charity dare.

Read MoreCramer gets soaked in ALS ice bucket challenge

"I can't say who has agreed, but I nominated the whole committee," said Sentence, refusing to name the mystery volunteer.

Sentence was nominated by HSBC's Chief Economist at HSBC Stephen King.

Sentence's calls for interest rate rises have also been ignored by the MPC. The BoE left rates at historically low levels on Thursday, keeping rates at 0.5 percent, despite improving economic data.

Read MoreIce Bucket Challenge rewriting charity model

It is unclear what would excite market watchers more, a modest hike in rates, or Mark Carney pouring cold water over himself.

Thousands of people worldwide have braved the freezing water challenge to raise awareness of neurodegenerative disease ALS. The stunt, which went viral last month, has been accepted by pop stars like Justin Biber, former U.S. president George Bush and even Prince Albert of Monaco.

Contact Europe News

  • CNBC NEWSLETTERS

    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    To learn more about how we use your information,
    please read our Privacy Policy.
    › Learn More

Europe Video

  • The FBI have stated that North Korea's government is responsible for the Sony attack. Neil Ashdown, deputy head of Asia analysis at IHS, weighs in, saying that it's difficult to "definitively attribute" a hacking attack to a particular group or state.

  • What were the main highlights of the EU Summit in Brussels? CNBC's Hadley Gamble gives you the lowdown.

  • Carnival Cruises earnings have beaten expectations in its fourth quarter, with lower fuel prices being a great help, says David Dingle, UK chairman of Carnival Cruises.