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  • Employees work on the assembly line at Hon Hai Group's Foxconn plant in Shenzhen, Guangdong province, China.

    Hewlett-Packard and Dell are keeping a close eye on a big jump in wages for workers that assemble Apple's iPhone in China, and could be forced to nudge up prices for their own products if labor costs keep rising.

  • The world's largest PC maker reported quarterly earnings that beat analysts' expectations but the company's revenue and outlook fell short as the company grapples with weak PC and printer sales.

  • Toy Fair 2012

    Since American International Toy Fair wrapped up last week, Consumer Nation has been looking at all the latest trends as the industry tries to revive sales.

  • Google Goggles

    People who constantly reach into a pocket to check a smartphone for bits of information will soon have another option: a pair of Google-made glasses that will be able to stream information to the wearer’s eyeballs in real time.

  • CS Joins $600 Apple Club

    Credit Suisse is upping its price target of Apple to $600, joining a growing club of bullish analysts on the Street, with the Fast Money team.

  • Stock futures declined Wednesday, following weak economic data from the euro zone and amid ongoing concerns over the region's debt crisis.

  • Dell

    The computer maker delivered earnings that missed analysts' expectations by a penny and a mixed outlook. Shares fell.

  • Box office

    It seems that the end of obsolescence is back for more blood. This time its unwary victim is the film industry.

  • Microsoft Sign

    As Microsoft shares hit a 4.5-year high, one analyst thinks the stock has room to close its performance gap with rival Apple, depending on the success of its upcoming Windows 8 launch.

  • market-insider-stocks-to-watch-200.jpg

    Take a look at some of Tuesday morning's early movers:

  • Chinese people line up to buy iPhone 4S in a China Unicom store in Beijing, China.

    China Telecom has signed a deal with Apple to sell iPhones in China, a move expected to boost sales for the U.S. company in a market where it has been struggling in recent months.

  • woman-shopping-mobile-phone-200.jpg

    Japanese companies Fujitsu and Panasonic plan to enter the European smartphone market as rivals Apple and Samsung have piled on the pressure in their previously isolated home market.

  • Apple iPad

    Apple's legal row over its iPad trademark in China creates a window of opportunity for rivals such as Lenovo Group and Samsung Electronics as they try to chip away at the U.S. firm's dominance of the potentially vast Chinese tablet market.

  • Coinstar

    Coinstar, the self-service retail business behind Coinstar change machines and Redbox movie-rental kiosks, is preparing for the decline of movie rentals by serving up new self-service options — coffee and electronics.

  • house_federal.jpg

    Unmanned drones are typically associated with war and spying. But a new law will permit the use of drones in the US for everything from selling real estate to dusting crops and monitoring oil spills.

  • As Microsoft shares hit a 4.5-year high, one analyst thinks the stock has room to close its performance gap with rival Apple, depending on the success of its upcoming Windows 8 launch.

  • ipad-child-200.jpg

    Dozens of mobile apps for kids, from alphabet and word games to flash cards and puzzles, do not disclose how they use children's personal data and may be violating privacy law, according to a new government survey.

  • Apple has nearly $100 billion in cash just sitting on its balance sheet, earning nothing more than a market rate of return. As the cash hoard grows ever larger, shareholders have grown increasingly more vocal about getting hold of it. TheStreet.com reports.

  • Apple Flirts With 500 Mark

    A look ahead of what's in store for Apple, with Mark Newton, Greywolf Execution Partners chief technical analyst.

  • businessman-banana-risk-200.jpg

    China's trademark system is a minefield of murky rules and opportunistic "trademark squatters" that even the world's biggest companies and their highly-paid lawyers find hard to navigate, as Apple and Facebook are the latest to find out.