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  • Stocks closed about a half-percent lower after a bargain-hunting rally collapsed late Wednesday, with traders booking gains from earlier in the day and refusing to give the market a vote of confidence.

  • While investors are worried about the sovereign debt crisis in Europe, should they also be concerned about China? Tim Seymour, founder of Emergingmoney.com, discussed his insights.

  • Stocks were off their sessions high, pulling back after European markets closed but still positive after enduring days of whipsaw trading.

  • In the investment strategist world, I tend to be pretty cautious. I do believe that while economies are recovering, it's going to be a long difficult climb from years of excesses.

  • The financial reform bill "could have been worse," said Matt McCormick, banking analyst and portfolio manager for Bahl & Gaynor Investment Counsel.

  • US stocks declined over 4% this week, with the Russell 2000 and NASDAQ Composite leading the sell-off.  During Friday's trading session, the CBOE Volatility Index rose to a 15-month high, while the Dow swung 279.71 points, dipping below the 10,000-mark, before erasing all of its losses to close up 125 points for the day.

  • The Dow popped over 100 points in the final minutes of trading Friday after a yo-yo session — and a rocky week. Financials gained. Dell was among a handful of decliners.

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    The week's vicious stock market slump set up the perfect buying opportunity for investors, who finally received their long-awaited market correction.

  • Expect wild volatility in European markets Friday, as the Continent awaits the German vote on euro-zone bailout package.

  • Stocks fell Wednesday as Germany's move to ban some naked short-selling fueled a fresh wave of worry about financial regulation. The CBOE volatility index, spiked above 35.

  • Stocks fell Wednesday as Germany's move to ban some naked short-selling fueled a wave of fears about exposure to riskier assets. The CBOE volatility index, spiked above 35.

  • Pete Najarian is more bearish than he's been in a long time. "Across the board many names look ready to break," he says.

  • The price of regulation: From financial regulatory reform to a ban on naked short selling in some German stocks, the markets are reacting to the prospects of more regulation, lower growth, less risk, and a higher cost of capital.

  • A late afternoon buying spree erased a triple digit loss in the Dow, sending stocks higher for the day. What must you know?

  • What will a European slowdown mean for U.S. stocks? That's the big debate on trading desks today. Those who are bullish on U.S. equities argue: not as much as you might think. Why not?

  • The Dow ended sharply lower Friday as growing worries about Europe overshadowed encouraging economic data. Still, the blue-chip index ended up 2.3 percent for the week.

  • US major indexes reversed last Thursday's steep drops on Monday on a near $1 trillion European Union relief package and on news that US regulators are looking at circuit breakers to prevent a re-run of last week's "flash" market meltdown.

  • Stocks fell heavily Friday as worries over the growing European debt crisis trumped some encouraging U.S. economic data. Financials, materials and techs were the biggest decliners.

  • If you’re looking for a market ‘tell’ keep your eye on this, says Todd Gordon of Forex.com. It's often a leading indicator for equities.

  • U.S. and European banks are both lower, for three reasons. With the exception of gold and gold stocks, commodity stocks are down 2-3 percent as energy and base metals weaken with the Euro falling below $1.25 today. And credit-card companies have their own troubles.