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  • starbucks_store_2.jpg

    The mobile payments industry went mainstream, as Starbucks and Square signed a deal to bring Square's service to Starbucks 7,000 locations. This could change the shape of the payments industry forever.

  • iger_robert_200.jpg

    Disney CEO Bob Iger told CNBC that people are still flocking to parks and spending more money there despite the tight economy. He said the entertainment giant also sees "room to increase pricing" further.

  • Apple Store

    The rivalry between Apple and Google kicked up another notch recently when the iPhone maker announced that it would not include a pre-loaded app for YouTube in the new version of its iPhone and iPad software, one analyst said.

  • Stocks eased off their best levels in the final hour of trading but still finished higher for a third-consecutive session Tuesday, with the S&P 500 and Nasdaq finishing above key levels, as investors bet on more stimulus from central banks to bolster the global economy.

  • Google

    Google adhered to its mission of "velocity, execution and focusing on the future" as it delivered an exceptional second quarter. The company was intent on putting its rivals on notice — namely Facebook, Microsoft, Amazon and, most importantly, its chief adversary Apple.

  • Internet Security

    The question is no longer who have hackers hit. It is who has not been hit. The organizations attacked by pranksters, criminal syndicates or foreign governments include Google, LinkedIn and the Central Intelligence Agency.

  • Credit Card swipe

    More small merchants are becoming a testing ground for new payment products. Is the new technology right for your business?

  • russia_1_200.jpg

    Russia has yielded many leading industrial companies that rank among global leaders in mining, metallurgy, petrochemicals and telecommunications. Despite the rapid development of the regional economy and the strides made over the past 20 years, WTO membership promises to be an important catalyst for growth in the Russian market.

  • Sir Richard Branson

    When starting Student magazine and then Virgin Music, Richard Branson followed five simple guidelines that he still finds relevant and useful today.

  • Google

    The market for social media marketing is heating up, and among the first big winners are two entrepreneurs whose four-year old software company, Wildfire, was just bought by Google for a reported $250 million.

  • PayPal

    Some businesses, frustrated by PayPal's aggressive antifraud measures, are looking at other ways to accept payments, the New York Times reports.

  • money-plant-in-hands-200.jpg

    Everyone is looking for bargains in today’s risky economy. Jim Grant, founder and editor of Grant’s Interest Rate Observer, is confident that money-making opportunities exist. He said that bargain hunters just need to know where to look.

  • Mark Zuckerberg

    Talk about awkward, it looks like Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's younger sister, Arielle Zuckerberg, is now a Google employee.

  • Ross Levinsohn

    Ross Levinsohn is leaving Yahoo, two weeks after the company announced he lost out on the top job to Google executive Marissa Mayer, the company said in a filing.

  • Apple

    Though there’s no indication a strategic investment is in the works, the two companies work closely together, and any talk of Twitter and Facebook spacer deepening their relationship continues to fascinate.

  • Apple

    Everyone freaked out over the weekend, when talk popped up of Apple investing in Twitter. It's not happening for one very simple reason: Apple doesn't need to.

  • In order to make money, your pool guy's got to get your pool cleaned in 20 minutes or less. Chances are, there are a few things he didn't tell you. Like, for example, there is no doorbell on your backyard. Here are 10 things your pool guy probably didn't tell you.

  • Mark Zuckerberg

    Several companies that were supposed to be the foundation of a new Internet era plummeted this week as analysts and investors downgraded their dreams. There were instant echoes of the crash of 2000, when the money stopped flowing, the dot-coms crumbled and Silicon Valley devolved into recriminations and lawsuits. NYT reports.

  • Have you ever been stumped by a job interview question like, "Tell me about yourself?" It gets so much harder than that. Here are the top 25 companies that give the hardest interviews — and some sample questions to see if you can handle it.

  • A trader at the New York Stock Exchange.

    It’s the kind of performance that can almost make you nostalgic for the good old dot-com days, when the fleecing of mom and pop investors was left to the Pets.com and iVillages of the world.