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Stocks Exxon Mobil Corp

  • U.S. stocks finished down for the week but up for the year with the S&P and the Dow closing a wildly volatile year up 23% and 19% respectively.  The NASDAQ Composite managed a gain of 44% for the year. 

  • dogs_ofthe_dow.jpg

    A popular investment strategy suggests buying the ten Dow Jones Industrial Average components with the highest yielding dividends. Here is the list going into 2010.

  • Traders work in the ten-year U.S. Treasury Note options pit at the Chicago Board of Trade in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.

    For the past 7 years, Farr, Miller & Washington has published our Top Ten Stocks for the coming year. The results have been very strong, but we need to be mindful that concentrated positions also concentrate risk.

  • Markets held gains on Tuesday after reports showed US home prices stabilized and consumer confidence improved. What should investors expect in the New Year and how should they be positioned? Tobias Levkovich, chief U.S. equity strategist at Citigroup, shared his strategies.

  • In the corporate world, bigger is often better. When it comes to legendary, industry-changing companies (think Microsoft), the more grandiose plans win out. The same is thought about mergers and acquisitions. Some mergers are so successful that we can’t remember a time when the two companies were distinct: Where would Disney be without Pixar, or J.P. Morgan without Chase?

    Here we look at the top 10 best, and worst, mergers of all time: The good, the bad, and the ugly.

  • Best & Worst of the Decade

    Following the sizzling 1990s (the markets’ best decade ever), stocks have had a disappointing decade overall, fizzling in the 2000s.  Here are the best and worst of the Dow.

  • dogs_ofthe_dow.jpg

    A popular investment strategy suggests buying the ten Dow Jones Industrial Average components with the highest yielding dividends. Here is the list going into 2010.

  • Light, sweet crude is holding above $76 Thursday on reports of a U.S. supply fall. What's next? John Kilduff, co-CIO of Round Earth Capital, and Chris Jarvis, president of Caprock Risk Management, offered CNBC their outlooks on oil, natural gas and the 2010 economy.

  • Oil Refinery in California

    The business of oil refining is mired in a deep crisis, with five refineries having shut down this year, including plants in Delaware, New Jersey, California and New Mexico.

  • The good news is that we have decisively broken into a higher trading range on the S&P 500. It took five weeks of trading in a range, but we did it.

  • Cramer fully expects more oil companies to follow in the footsteps of Exxon as they realize the potential in natural gas, so this begs the question: What is the next XTO?

  • If the US continues to focus on reducing its carbon footprint, natural gas is probably a better buy for investors than oil, said Phil Weiss, senior energy analyst at Argus Research Company.

  • U.S. stocks finished the week mixed, with the S&P and the Dow posting modest losses, while the NASDAQ Composite managed a gain of 0.98%. 

  • Find out which to companies could be the next XTO Energy.

  • Many investors see junk bonds as the way to go, but are the high yields worth the risk now? Thomas Karsten, president and CIO of Karsten Financial, told CNBC where investors should put their money.

  • Plus, get calls on solar power, natural gas, the Internet and more.

  • Growth in 2010 will be stronger than what the markets expect, said Barry Knapp, head of U.S. portfolio strategy at Barclays. He shared his stock picks and market outlook for next year.

  • Ben Bernanke, Federal Reserve Chairman

    The consumer price index and the Fed's afternoon statement Wednesday will take on even more importance to markets, after producer prices hinted at a whiff of inflation Tuesday.

  • Energy stocks were a group closing higher on the session. Is this the sign of a bounce back, or just a temporary pop?

  • Asian stocks ended mixed on Tuesday as investors stayed cautious ahead of the two-day Federal Reserve meeting despite a positive end on Wall Street in the overnight session.