Stocks Exxon Mobil Corp

More

  • Traders at the New York Stock Exchange

    While the recent surge may vanish quickly, it came with something Wall Street hasn't seen in awhile—buying into a rally.

  • Stocks rallied Monday as investors welcomed news the government had stepped in to backstop troubled bank Citigroup. Shares of Citigroup jumped nearly 60 percent, ending just shy of $6 a share. 

  • Turkey.jpg

    Still feeling shocked by how much your portfolio has fallen in value in the past couple of months?  With the holidays upon us, here is a look at the purchasing power those shares still have.  After all, a share of Berkshire Hathaway can still buy you a Porsche 911.

  • The markets close out a negative week with a late day rally on the expected nomination of Timothy Geithner to the position of Treasury Secretary.

  • In the last 'Stop Trading' segment of yet another dramatic week in U.S. and global markets, Cramer talks to Erin Burnett (together in the same room for the first time in quite a while). After trading some banter about her recent sojourn in Russia, they bring up Citigroup, Wal-Mart and several other stocks on Cramer's mind.

  • graphic_word_ofthe_street.jpg

    Stocks plunged yet again on Thursday, sending the S&P 500 to its lowest level since 1997 – and completely erasing more than a decade of stock market gains.

  • Stocks plunged Thursday as anxiety about the economy and the government's wheel-spinning on the auto bailout and TARP plagued the market throughout the day, culminating in a massive final hour selloff. The Dow ended below 7,600, a more than five-year low. The S&P closed at an 11 1/2-year low.

  • Volume was heavier; instead of a low volume, high volatility sell-off, this was an old fashioned high volume, high volatility sell-off; in other words, sellers materialized.

  • Investors are beginning to fear that the stock market may be in limbo for the next two months.

  • graphic_word_ofthe_street.jpg

    The Dow staged a late afternoon comeback on Tuesday after a positive outlook from Hewlett-Packard offset fears of more losses at Citigroup and other banks.

  • You know it's been a bad Wall Street session when Cramer starts off his "Stop Trading" segment with the blunt comment, "This is a horrible market." He goes on to list the various factors: insurers, banks, retail and minerals (he didn't even mention the autos!).

  • On Tuesday, U.S. legislators heard testimony from Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson and Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke, the TARP bailout seems to ire everyone — and few can agree what to do with the Big 3 automakers. CNBC's experts offered their views on the economy — and actually found reason for investor hope.

  • webxtra_thumb.jpg

    In this Web Extra the traders look at commodity stocks. Find out why Guy Adami thinks ExxonMobil is a buy at $69... and why Jeff Macke thinks he's crazy.

  • Many oil companies have held up surprisingly well, despite the falling price of crude — but options traders apparently are not optimistic about the future of Chevron.

  • graphic_word_ofthe_street.jpg

    The Dow staged a monster rally on Thursday, as bargain hunters rushed back into the market to scoop up beaten-down shares.

  • Stocks closed sharply higher as bargain hunters rushed back into the market to scoop up beaten-down shares.

  • As the market turmoil continues, companies that once sat at the top of the S&P 500 find themselves falling further and further down the list.

  • Stocks looked set to go three for three, opening lower once again as doubt about the effectiveness of government intervention seeped deeper into the market. The Dow fell nearly 200 points, or 2 percent, in the first few minutes of trading.

  • Stocks looked set to go three for three, opening lower once again as doubt about the effectiveness of government intervention seeped deeper into the market. The Dow fell nearly 200 points, or 2 percent, in the first few minutes of trading.

  • Stocks looked set to go three for three, opening lower once again as doubt about the effectiveness of government intervention seeped deeper into the market. The Dow fell nearly 200 points, or 2 percent, in the first few minutes of trading.