Stocks Alcoa Inc

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    Here's our Fast Money Final Trade. Our gang gives you tomorrow's best trades, right now!

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    The Dow finished higher on Thursday propelled by optimism about a major deal in the chemicals sector and comments from Ben Bernanke. What's the "Word on the Street?"

  • The Dow chart looked like a yo-yo Thursday as traders pounded financials including Freddie Mac and Lehman Brothers and oil prices surged more than $5 a barrel. Still, all three major indexes eked out gains by the closing bell.

  • The Dow chart looked like a yo-yo Thursday as traders pounded financials including Freddie Mac and Lehman Brothers, overshadowing any positive news the market had to offer.

  • Stocks flipped and somersaulted Thursday as investors juggled worries about capital constraints at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac with a drop in jobless claims, merger activity and encouraging retail sales.

  • Airplane Takeoff

    The chief executive officers of a dozen U.S. airlines, beset by record fuel costs that have caused several to cut jobs, reduce capacity and impose higher fees on customers, are now asking for their customers' help to curb the rise of oil prices.

  • Stocks ended a tumultuous session with a late selloff that left all three major indexes in bear-market territory.  Financials fell sharply amid worries about more shoes to drop and techs took a hit after Cisco's chief said customers don't see a recovery until next year.

  • Stocks declined, following a two-day rally, as a report showed crude inventories shrunk last week.  Oil climbed in a choppy session after falling more than $9 abarrel in the past two sessions.

  • Stocks declined, following a two-day rally, as a report showed crude inventories shrunk last week.  Oil rebounded $1 to $2 a barrel after shedding more than $9 in the prior two sessions.

  • Stocks declined, following a two-day rally, as a report showed crude inventories shrunk last week.  Oil rebounded $1 to $2 a barrel after shedding more than $9 in the prior two sessions.

  • Two weeks ago, I said I haven't seen the Street so bearish since just after 9/11. This morning Investors Intelligence reported that their Bull/Bear survey of financial newsletter writers fell to 27.4 percent bullish, the lowest reading since July 1994. Bears rose to 47.3 percent, the highest since 1995.

  • The debate about whether stocks are finding a floor is gaining momentum, but traders agree it's the earnings season that will help decide the details.

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    The Dow rose Tuesday in another turbulent session after a pullback in oil prices eased worries about consumer and business spending. What's the "Word on the Street?"

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    Alcoa shares hopped about 4 percent in extended trading Tuesday as the company turned in a profit and sales that were lower than last year but still managed to beat expectations.

  • It was another wild trading day of ups and downs but stocks ran to the finish line and pulled off a decent gain as oil dropped more than $5 a barrel.

  • Some traders are also turning bullish. John Mendelson of the Stanford Group issued a buy signal late in the day; traders tell me it was his 3rd buy signal in 5 years, and the prior two calls were very good.

  • Stocks wavered in another volatile trading session Tuesday as existing-home sales fell more than expected, oil dropped $5 and Alcoa dragged on the Dow. Comments from Bernanke and a $2 drop in oil prices offered the market some support.

  • Stocks wavered in another volatile trading session Tuesday as existing-home sales fell more than expected, oil dropped $5 and Alcoa dragged on the Dow. Comments from Bernanke and a $2 drop in oil prices offered the market some support.

  • Stocks wobbled Tuesday after a report showed existing-home sales fell more than expected in May. Comments from Bernanke and a $2 drop in oil prices offered the market some support.

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    The conventional wisdom on Alcoa is pretty simple: surging energy costs + aluminum price increases that lag other commodities = unimpressive profits. Unless the metals giant surprises (nearly) everyone, earnings season is set to start with a whimper.