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  • Stocks opened lower on Wall Street Monday, led by financials, after brokers downgraded several big names in the sector, including American Express.

  • Stocks opened lower on Wall Street Monday, led by financials, after brokers downgraded several big names in the sector, including American Express.

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    "I think the market is in a little bit better shape than most people are willing to give it credit for," Laszlo Birinyi told CNBC.   And the president of Birinyi Associates thinks investors would be better served by individual stocks than by exchange-traded funds (ETFs). 

  • U.S. stocks opened lower Monday.  Microsoft's bid for Yahoo, seen as a sign that many equities are attractively priced relative to value,  inspired some investors.

  • Floor traders are in a great mood after the Giants win! President Bush acknowledging a weaker economy will lead to higher deficits. Looking for budget deficit to double to $410 billion. What's up with China? Shanghai Composite up 8% overnight. And: Airlines looking up.

  • Stocks closed with a big rally, led by beaten-down financial shares, but still ended one of the worst Januarys in years.

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    Volatile markets can eat a portfolio alive, but they can also create real bargains for investors, according to senior editor Jeffrey Kosnett of Kiplinger's Personal Finance.

  • The Street wants a 50 bp cut from the Fed on Wednesday; it's widely believed that a 25 bp cut would be a real disappointment. The other hope for bulls is that nonfarm payrolls surprises on the upside this Friday.

  • Tuesday is shaping up to be one of the busiest earnings days of the quarter so far, but it's likely the markets will continue to focus instead on the Fed.

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    A jittery stock market advanced Monday as investors took a dismal new home sales report as a sign the Federal Reserve will lower rates this week. What's the word on the Street?

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    Stocks closed sharply higher as investors snapped up financial and homebuilder stocks on hopes that the Federal Reserve would keep cutting interest rates to prevent a recession.

  • Zamunda Coin

    So last Monday, before the Super Bowl XLII matchup was set, I predicted that a Patriots-Giants ticket would cost an average of $4,300. The average I set was the average ticket sold, according to StubHub.com, which I felt was a good metric since they sell so many tickets and release the data.

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    Anecdotal evidence that the U.S. consumer's marathon spending spree may be slowing to a trot increases daily. By some measures, the U.S. consumer makes up about 19 percent of the world economy and 70 percent of the U.S. economy, so the health of American consumption is key.

  • A "clever and sharp" restaurant guide company with "telling" rankings and "a penchant for quote marks" from its thousands of "in-the-know" reviewers is "on the block."

  • Asian markets ended mostly lower Monday, while the price of gold hit a new record high above $900 a troy ounce as investors sought protection against a potential U.S. recession and a weaker dollar. Hong Kong stocks closed 1.5 percent lower and South Korean shares lost almost 1 percent. 

  • Strong evidence is emerging that consumer spending, a bulwark against recession over the last year even as energy prices surged and the housing market sputtered, has begun to slow sharply at every level of the American economy, from the working class to the wealthy.

  • Quarterly reports next week from Citi, JP Morgan, Washington Mutual, Wells Fargo, Comerica, Merrill Lynch, PNC. There are plenty looking to go long after the reports are out, based on valuation. For example, Citi and Wells Fargo are trading in the bottom 10 percent of their historical valuation.

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    Shares of American Express  plunged Friday after the credit-card lender warned that fourth-quarter earnings will fall and a slowing U.S. economy will hamper profit in 2008.

  • Reports of more writedowns at Merrill Lynch and credit wrinkles at American Express are outweighing the relief that Bank of America is swooping in to buy troubled Countrywide.