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  • AOL's Armstrong apologizes

    AOL's Tim Armstrong fired an employee on a conference call. Armstrong has since issued an internal memo apologizing for his actions. Former Medtronic Chairman & CEO Bill George, and Marcus Lemonis, host of "The Profit," discuss.

  • Sorry... but you're still fired

    AOL CEO Tim Armstrong has apologized after publicly firing an employee. Edward Freeman, a professor at the University of Virginia Darden School of Business, weighs in.

  • AOL CEO apologizes

    AOL CEO Tim Armstrong is apologizing for the way he fired Patch Creative Director Abel Lenz. CNBC's Julia Boorstin has the details.

  • Tim Armstrong, chief executive officer of AOL Inc.

    CEO of AOL issued an unusual apology on Tuesday to his entire staff for the public manner in which he fired an employee during an internal conference call. The NYT reports.

  • Steve Case: Bullish on what's happening broadly in US

    CNBC's Julia Boorstin speaks with Steve Case, the co-founder of AOL and CEO of Revolution, about the news Tim Armstrong allegedly fired a Patch employee, as well as his thoughts on immigration reform, and entrepreneurship outside of Silicon Valley.

  • It’s hard to enjoy the lazy days of summer when there’s so much to worry about: debt ceiling, the next Fed chairman and the bad portents of the “Hindenburg Omen.”

  • AOL's CEO embraces his inner Donald Trump

    AOL chief Tim Armstrong reportedly fired a top executive during a mass conference call. CNBC's Julia Boorstin has the details.

  • Patch.com employee reportedly fired

    CNBC's Julia Boorstin shows a leaked clip of AOL CEO Tim Armstrong reportedly firing a Patch.com employee. Armstrong co-founded Patch.com, and sold it to AOL in 2007.

  • 'Need to Know' accused of leaking embargoed info

    U.S. authorities are investigating Deutsche Börse's "Need to Know News" service, and AOL CEO Tim Armstrong reportedly fired an employee on a conference call. CNBC's John Carney and Bob Pisani, discuss.

  • AOL CEO reportedly fires Patch.com employee

    AOL chief Tim Armstrong told employees of Patch that if they're not on board with the company's strategy, then they should leave. CNBC's Julia Boorstin reports.

  • AOL's CEO: You're fired!

    AOL's CEO Tim Armstrong fired a Patch.com employee while on a conference call with a thousand employees. CNBC's Julia Boorstin has the latest details.

  • Tim Armstrong, CEO and chairman of AOL

    In a tense conference call last week, AOL CEO Tim Armstrong abruptly—and awkwardly—fired his creative director, in an audio clip now going viral.

  • AOL's Armstrong fires patch employee

    While on a conference call, AOL CEO Tim Armstrong fired a Patch employee in front of 1,000 co-workers. CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin has the details.

  • AOL offices in Palo Alto, Calif.

    AOL announced better-than-expected profits, and plans to acquire video ad platform Adap.Tv. This deal marks a "very important day in AOL history," CEO Tim Armstrong told CNBC.

  • Check out which companies are making headlines before the bell on Wednesday:

  • AOL to Buy Adap.tv for $322M in cash, $83M in stock

    "If you want to win in this space, you have to actually get organized around it and get in front of it," said Tim Armstrong, AOL chairman & CEO, discussing the details of his company's acquisition of Adap.tv, a video advertising platform for the world's largest brands, agencies, publishers and ad networks.

  • Time Warner second quarter results due out Wednesday morning are expected to benefit from growth in advertising and subscription revenue at its cable networks.

  • Already cranky about the Fed, stock traders will be eyeing the Treasury's 10-year note auction Wednesday to see whether it helps drive interest rates higher.

  • It was a literal flood of economic numbers this week for the Fed and investors to chew on—ending with Friday's employment report. This is Talking Squawk.

  • Your newsfeed may soon have TV-style advertisements. Facebook plans to sell 15-second spots to marketers in an effort to dip into the gold mine of money made by TV networks ad deals.