Stocks Bed Bath & Beyond Inc

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    A year from now, the 11 percent of American households that still get their TV over the airwaves will have their screens go black, unless they upgrade. Analog TV will be dead, as of Feb 17, 2009, and we will be living in an all-digital world.

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    Investors are weighing a weak jobs report and the threat of bond-insurer downgrades with enthusiasm over Microsoft’s bid for Yahoo. CNBC asked the experts where investors should place their bets to make it through this volatility.

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    Super Bowl XLII: Beyond football, big-screen TVs, pizza, beer and gambling all come to mind.  Are stocks in those areas good for your portfolio? Pick carefully, says Brent Wilsey. The president of Wilsey Asset Management named the stocks that'll be winners -- and that ones that will fumble.

  • With the big game just around the corner, here are some of the companies that are primed for big business on the back of Super Sunday.

  • With the big game just around the corner, here are even more companies that are primed for big business on the back of Super Sunday...

  • Sprint Nextel and Clearwire are in "advanced discussions" to form a joint venture that would build a high-speed wireless netowkr using WiMax technology, according to a media report Tuesday.

  • Wal-Mart Stores has a Super Bowl blitz of its own: the world's biggest retailer said it is slashing prices of thousands of items that football fans might want ahead of the hotly-awaited Giants-Patriots game.

  • The government's new economic stimulus plan? Whaddya think? Is it just going to be an economic sugar high? Or will it be the nutritious, high-fiber oatmeal needed to get our economy going again?

  • Williams Sonoma

    Home goods retailer Williams-Sonoma reported a decline in its holiday same-store sales Tuesday and gave a weak outlook for the current quarter and upcoming fiscal year, sending its shares down 11 percent in morning trade.

  • Several interesting strategist/analyst calls this morning, all trying to pick a bottom: 1) Credit Suisse recommending an overweight in U.S. stocks because the Fed is likely to cut rates to respond to the slowing economy quicker than their European counterparts.

  • You knew it was coming simply because we all know that stocks, particularly tech stocks, don't move in only one direction despite what we've seen since Jan. 1. It took a stunning IBM pre-announcement to get the ball rolling, and that ball is rolling, fast.

  • Is the U.S. market getting beaten-up enough to get interesting? Strategists at Credit Suisse seems to think so. They are recommending a 5 percent overweight in U.S. stocks because the Fed is likely to cut rates to respond to the slowing economy quicker than their European counterparts.

  • U.S. chain stores, reeling from the slowest holiday shopping season in five years, got some more bad news Sunday: 2008 will not be any better and could see changes that may shift the retail playing field forever.

  • Kevin O'Marah, chief strategist at AMR Research, has developed a unique "supply-chain strategy" -- and uses it to compile a Top 25 stocks list that beat the 2007 market hands-down.

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    Some electronics retailers had huge success in 2007, but the year left others bruised. A CES retail panel featured executives from both kinds of companies.

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    The financial sector is expected to weigh on corporate earnings in the fourth quarter. But outside the sector, the news is upbeat.

  • Quicker Ticker

    Our traders are good - but you knew that! Check out their latest picks that paid.

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    After beating their own benchmark index for the last five years, Standard & Poor’s equity research team is betting on the biggest U.S. jam maker and the Magic Kingdom, among 40 companies in this year’s PowerPicks stock portfolio, to outperform again in 2008.

  • Stocks ended the first week of the new year with steep losses as Friday's weak employment report spurred fears of a looming recession.

  • A shopper leaves the Bed Bath & Beyond store in Ellisville, Mo.

    U.S. home goods retailer Bed Bath & Beyond posted a lower quarterly profit and warned that its fourth-quarter results would be lower than expected, sending its shares down almost 10 percent.