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Stocks BP PLC

  • A trader at the New York Stock Exchange.

    "The recent market collapse has once again rewarded the short sellers," says the head of a website that tracks daily short movements. "Short selling is back."

  • Art Cashin explains why the last hour of trading has seen a pullback—even if stocks were higher throughout the day.

  • Investors seemed to be at a loss for moves on Friday with technicals favoring the bears but fundamentals appearing bullish.

  • Stocks pared their losses Friday after a report that showed consumer sentiment came in better than expected. Art Hogan, director of global equity products at Jefferies, shared his market outlook.

  • S&P futures dropped 6 points on the disappointing U.S. May retail sales. But it was noted that building material sales were notably weak, down 9.3 percent, which may be due to the expiration of the homebuyer tax credit. Still, motor vehicle parts were down 1.7 percent, clothing sales were also down 1.3 percent. Sales up at restaurants, sporting goods, furniture. Elsewhere this week the news has been more positive...

  • Stocks struggled to hold onto gains Friday after getting a boost from a better-than-expected reading on consumer sentiment.

  • US stock index futures searched for direction Friday, as Chinese inflation quickened to a 19-month high in May and Spain denied reports that it had made a request of aid from the European Union.

  • obama_bp_speech_200.jpg

    American populist rhetoric threatens to destroy not only one of Britain’s most cherished companies, but the “special relationship” between the United States and Britain, analysts told CNBC Friday.

  • BP Station

    There's a bit of a British backlash over BP. They're upset over the way the White House is treating the company after it caused the biggest environmental disaster in US history. We want to know if you think the Brits are being overly sensitive. Share your opinion in our poll.

  • Wall Street sign

    After Thursday's big rally on Wall Street, markets on Friday will turn their focus to retail sales and consumer sentiment data.

  • Stocks rose on Thursday after a drop in jobless claims and confirmation of strong Chinese exports. Are we seeing a bounceback—and how should investors approach the markets? Mark Travis, CEO of Intrepid Capital Funds, discussed his best plays.

  • Over the past several weeks Goldman has been leading the S&P by about a couple hours. But on Thursday they decoupled. How will they reconcile on Friday?

  • Stocks were higher in afternoon trading Thursday, led by energy and industrials, as encouraging economic news out of the U.S. and China fueled recovery hopes.

  • In what may be a spoof so hilariously on target you'll want to cry, UCBcomedy has imagined what might happen if a cup of coffee spills during an executive meeting at BP headquarters. "Sir, I think we may be underestimating the size of the spill." It goes from bad to worse. Then the Halliburton guys show up.

  • Stocks were higher in afternoon trading Thursday, led by energy and industrials, as encouraging economic news out of the U.S. and China fueled recovery hopes.

  • America must ramp up its investment in energy research and science, Xerox Chairman and CEO Ursula Burns told CNBC Thursday, her comments coming on the heels of a new plan for energy innovation released this morning by a group of the country’s top business leaders.

  • Crisis_In_The_Gulf_badge.jpg

    It's time for President Obama to skip the tough talk and take decisive action to clean up the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, says CNBC's Dennis Kneale.

  • BP has lost 52 percent of its market value since the spill started, an equivalent of $100 billion. But the company is on strong enough financial footing to survive, said Fadel Gheit, managing director of oil and gas research at Oppenheimer.

  • Don't get used to Thursday's advance. The traders are concerned we may give back most of it by the close.

  • Mark Cuban

    BP needs to stop “counterpunching” in the Gulf region and actively support local business to rebuild the region, entrepreneur Mark Cuban told CNBC Thursday.