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Stocks BP PLC

  • Euro bills and coins

    Wall Street may finally shift its focus back to the U.S. economy, after weeks of zeroing in on problems in the euro zone. The big report of the week? Friday's May employment number, which could be a game-changer.

  • Friday markets ended with a precipitous selloff that made for the worst May since 1962 and worst month in general since November 2008. Are US markets headed for recovery, or is a double-dip in the works? CNBC heard from expert economists, strategists and investors. See what they had to say...and decide for yourself.

  • On a week that saw Apple surpass Microsoft in market cap, the BP oil spill continue to impact the ecosystem and drillers, Spain lose its AAA rating, and the worst May performance for the Dow since 1940, and the S&P since 1962, the major indexes managed to end the week on a positive note, except for the Dow which closed down slightly.

  • Sellers dominated May with the Dow's total monthly loss totaling 8%; that's the worst May drop since 1940. Are we in for a cruel summer?

  • Wall Street limped to the finish of an ugly May, dropping on European debt fears and lackluster economic news, though stocks were well off their lows heading into a holiday weekend.

  • Given the recent Gulf oil spill and the company's response...

  • To no one’s shock or awe, President Obama reversed his decision from two months ago to allow oil drilling off the Virginia coast. In his press conference yesterday the president also extended the moratorium on new deepwater drilling permits for six months and postponed Shell’s plan to drill exploratory wells off the Alaska coast.

  • This bull market will continue for "another couple of years," said Puru Saxena, CEO of Puru Saxena Wealth Management. He shared his market outlook.

  • Rep. Charles Boustany

    Republican Congressman Charles Boustany of Louisiana says the Obama administration move is a" knee-jerk" reaction to the BP oil spill disaster.

  • U.S. stock index futures pointed to a lackluster open Friday as investors waited for key economic data to verify that recovery is building momentum.

  • Wall Street sign

    Stocks wind down what's shaping up to be the worst May since 1962 but could end the week on an upswing, if there's no fresh bad news from Europe.

  • The Lightning Round is extended in this CNBC.com exclusive feature.

  • On Thursday President Obama made it clear that if oil drilling was to continue, it would be under his watchful eye.

  • Stocks ended the session on a high note, led by energy, tech and financials. The Dow gained more than 250 points while other major averages also finished strongly.

  • BP shares have tumbled more than 25 percent since the explosion in the Gulf coast last month, but are trading higher Thursday. Is this a good time to get into the firm? Mark Gilman, oil analyst at The Benchmark Company, shared his insights.

  • Right now, traders are focused on 1086 in the S&P, says Steve Grasso. If that level can hold the next key technical level will be...

  • In 2005, President Bush received massive criticism for what many viewed as a slow response to Hurricane Katrina. Five years later...

  • Confused yet? Stocks rallying worldwide, but off their highs, as China denying it is reviewing its holding of euro sovereign bonds, while Spain won parliamentary backing for an austerity budget (by a single vote!). Few believe this...

  • In a television interview the other day with George Stephanopoulos, James Carville registered his disbelief that the White House did not immediately seize upon Deepwater Horizon to exploit for political gain. ... Therefore, with the oil complex bracing for a barrage of blame when Obama travels to Louisiana tomorrow, the sector will continue to come under pressure.

  • Market opportunities are plenty but resist temptation and wait for prices to fall further, says Beat Lenherr, chief global strategist at LGT Capital Management.