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Citigroup Inc

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  • Wachovia Is Next Bank to Buy Back Auction-Rate Debt Friday, 15 Aug 2008 | 2:47 PM ET
    A Wachovia branch bank.

    Wachovia plans to buy back nearly $9 billion in auction-rate debt, settling federal and state probes and making it the fifth major bank this month to agree to help stabilize the debt market.

  • merrill_lynch_building.jpg

    New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo said Friday he is sending a letter to Merrill Lynch notifying the investment bank that his office will file suit against it imminently as part of an investigation into the collapse of the auction-rate securities market.

  • Video: Bear Market Rally or Oil Price Deflation? Friday, 15 Aug 2008 | 10:39 AM ET

    The U.S. markets closed up Thursday -- despite higher inflation and joblessness data. Is this a bear market rally or are declining oil prices at the heart of it? Jack Bouroudjian, chairman at Capital Markets Technology, and Steen Jakobsen, global head of asset management, executive director & CIO at Saxo Bank, give their insights to CNBC.

  • Stocks Give Up Gains as Energy Stocks Fall Friday, 15 Aug 2008 | 10:28 AM ET

    Wall Street shook off more signs of consumer weakness and instead focused on plunging oil prices, sending stocks up as financials continued to gain.

  • Who's Settled, Who Hasn't in Auction-Rate Probe Thursday, 14 Aug 2008 | 4:25 PM ET

    Various state regulators and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission are investigating whether banks and brokerages that underwrote auction-rate securities—a $330 billion market of long-term debt whose yields reset through weekly or monthly auctions—falsely or fraudulently told clients that the securities were as safe and as liquid as cash.

  • Stocks Close Higher, Led by Financials Thursday, 14 Aug 2008 | 3:43 PM ET

    Stocks closed higher, with bank shares rising broadly, though the market pulled back from its biggest gains as oil stemmed its slide.

  • Probe of Auction-Rate Debt Is Far From Over: Cuomo Thursday, 14 Aug 2008 | 3:23 PM ET
    The New York Stock Exchange, downtown New York City.

    New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo told CNBC that his investigation into auction-rate securities sold by banks and brokerages is far from over.

  • JPMorgan, Morgan Stanley Settle Auction-Debt Probe Thursday, 14 Aug 2008 | 11:48 AM ET
    The New York Stock Exchange, downtown New York City.

    JPMorgan Chase and Morgan Stanley agreed to repurchase a combined $7 billion in auction-rate securities as part of a settlement with regulators.

  • Some Wall Street Firms Near Pact On Auction Debt Thursday, 14 Aug 2008 | 8:07 AM ET
    The New York Stock Exchange, downtown New York City.

    Some Wall Street banks and brokerages are nearing a settlement with regulators over allegations that they misled investors over the sale of auction-rate securities, CNBC has learned.

  • Dow Drops As Banks Fall Wednesday, 13 Aug 2008 | 9:03 PM ET
    graphic_word_ofthe_street.jpg

    The Dow declined by triple digits on Wednesday with financial shares selling off for a second straight day on fresh concerns about the widening impact of the mortgage crisis.

  • Mechanism for Credit Is Still Stuck Wednesday, 13 Aug 2008 | 10:32 AM ET
    Credit Crunch

    A year after financial tremors first shook Wall Street, a crucial artery of modern money management remains broken. And until that conduit is fixed or replaced, borrowers will see interest rates continue to rise even as availability worsens for home mortgages, student loans, auto loans and commercial mortgages, says the New York Times.

  • We were reminded today that lower commodities and a higher dollar were not going to solve all the world's problems. What happened is that financials again came to the fore and reminded everyone that:

  • New York Bank Probe Not Over Yet: Cuomo's Office  Tuesday, 12 Aug 2008 | 4:02 PM ET

    Some big Wall Street banks may have been premature in believing New York State's investigation into auction-rate securities was over, people inside New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo's office told CNBC.

  • Stocks Close Lower On Selloff in Financials Tuesday, 12 Aug 2008 | 3:04 PM ET

    Stocks closed lower—even though oil fell to $113 a barrel—as a fresh round of warnings about banking troubles squelched the market's week-long rally.

  • Foreclosures in a Football Field Tuesday, 12 Aug 2008 | 1:38 PM ET
    New England Patriots' stadium

    It’s still pre-season for football, but on Tuesday in New England, the Patriots' stadium will be open. It’s not for football and it’s not for fans -- it’s for borrowers in danger of losing their homes and for the mortgage lenders and banks who hold or service their loans.

  • Wall Street's Losses Might Give It A Tax Holiday Tuesday, 12 Aug 2008 | 10:30 AM ET
    New York City Skyline

    Some Wall Street companies might not resume paying New York City taxes for "a number of years'' because they can offset future profits with the losses they are currently suffering, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said on Monday. 

  • More Bank Losses Show Credit Crisis Far From Over Tuesday, 12 Aug 2008 | 10:05 AM ET
    Credit Crunch

    The financial sector took several more body blows as losses from the credit crisis continued to mount at some of the world's biggest banks.

  • Talent-Hungry Small Firms Cheer Wall Street Job Cuts Tuesday, 12 Aug 2008 | 9:46 AM ET
    New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)

    Smaller financial firms have found a way to capitalize on their larger rivals' woes, moving to snap up some of the top talent cast adrift by sweeping layoffs at leading investment banks.

  • UBS Posts Worse-than-Expected Quarterly Loss Tuesday, 12 Aug 2008 | 9:38 AM ET
    ubssign2.jpg

    UBS will separate its investment bank from its prized wealth management arm, paving the way to sell the business that made it Europe's biggest casualty of the credit crunch.

  • Stocks Suffer After Latest Bank Warnings Tuesday, 12 Aug 2008 | 9:33 AM ET

    Stocks moved lower off the market opening on a fresh round of bad news for financials and an economic sign that the US consumer was continuing to struggle.