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Stocks Citigroup Inc

  • Though they were at the helm of companies that were bruised or broken by the credit crunch, these 12 CEOs were still offered fat severance packages when they were shown the door.Take a look at these subprime CEOs and their golden parachutes, including the one who apparently declined his multi-million dollar exit package. The packages include cash, benefits, stock options and other forms of compensation and based on company proxy statements.

    These 11 CEOs were the helm of companies that were bruised or broken by the credit crunch. Take a look at the money they had coming to them.

  • George Washington Bridge

    While regulators were sprinting to save the financial system last month, someone was making a lot of money — by betting against the State of New Jersey, the New York Times reported.

  • This once-great company now operates in some of the worst parts of the economy.

  • Stocks declined Thursday as dismal reports on factory orders and jobless claims piled on to a market already on edge about a freeze in the credit markets and the bailout bill as it heads to the House. GE was the biggest drag on the Dow.

  • Government Bailout

    The U.S. Senate passed a revised $700 billion bailout bill, breathing life back into closely watched legislation that supporters say will revive paralyzed credit markets.

  • Government Bailout

    The U.S. Senate passed a revised $700 billion bailout bill, breathing life back into closely watched legislation that supporters say will revive paralyzed credit markets.

  • Stocks ended lower Wednesday amid concerns about strained credit markets and the economic slowdown.  Banks rallied as investors were encouraged by progress on bailout talks on Capitol Hill.  GE got a vote of confidence -- to the tune of $3 billion -- from Warren Buffett.

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    As Congress tries again to pass a financial rescue plan, the question remains whether a bailout is actually needed—and if so, what are the options.

  • If some other recent offerings are any indication, this might be the time to buy.

  • GE's announcement of a $15 billion capital raise ($12 b in common, $3 b in preferred to Warren Buffett with a 10 percent dividend) is difficult news for shareholders, but everyone agrees that two things need to be done:

  • The New York Times can't seem to get enough of Cramer lately. Check it out.

  • Once more, it's the noise coming from Washington Wednesday that could drive markets. Hope that the bill would be resuscitated before the end of the week is sending stocks higher.

  • You know what? Hank Paulson may not be the most powerful financial person in the country right now. That honor goes to Sheila Bair, the chairman of the FDIC. In recent weeks, Ms. Bair has held the banking system together, coordinating smooth takeovers of distressed banks in deals run and controlled by her agency.

  • All major U.S. Indices end the third quarter on a historic note.  The Dow and S&P 500 had their fourth consecutive quarterly drop, tumbling 4.40% and 9.01% respectively.  The NASDAQ Composite fell the most among the major Indices for the quarter, down 9.19%.

  • Stocks rebounded Tuesday amid hope that Congress will regroup and find a way to approve a $700 billion bailout plan for banks which it rejected on Monday.  Financials rallied and Apple, one of the hardest hit techs on Monday, gained 4 percent.

  • A small but very vocal minority of the trading community continues to insist that the TARP bailout plan should not be passed. So what IS their plan?

  • Stocks rebounded Tuesday amid hope that Congress will regroup and find a way to approve a $700 billion bailout plan for banks which it rejected on Monday.  Financials rallied and Apple, one of the hardest hit techs on Monday, gained 4 percent.

  • Stocks opened higher Tuesday amid hope that Congress will regroup and find a way to approve a $700 billion bailout plan for banks which it rejected on Monday.

  • For a better understanding of the Wachovia/Citigroup deal and what is happening in the consumer banking arena, Bankrate.com spoke with Jim Eckenrode, banking and payments research executive at TowerGroup in Needham, Mass.

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    What is a regular investor to make of it all? What about people who have money in bank accounts? The New York Times provides some answers to questions that are probably on your mind.