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Stocks Citigroup Inc

  • For the week ending Friday, October 3, 2008,  the major U.S. Indices declined steeply on continued uncertainties over the financial bailout / rescue plan, concerns in the credit markets and more economic deterioration.

  • Stocks hovered around the flat line Friday afternoon after the House approved the revised $700 bailout bill for Wall Street. Apple shares recovered as did shares of Hartford and other insurers.

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    In a live interview minutes after the House of Representatives passed the bailout bill, Warren Buffett told CNBC's Becky Quick that the measure is not a "panacea." While the rescue package will provide some tools to deal with the financial crisis and prevent what could have been a far worse situation, Buffett predicted that it will be quite a while before the economic recession bottoms out.

  • Stocks rallied Friday as investors pinned their hopes on the House passing the bailout bill today. Apple shares recovered after the company denied a rumor about Jobs' health.

  • That's not Wall Street! Here's the headline of the day: California might need emergency loan of $7 billion--unable to access routine short-term loans.

  • The revised bailout bill being debated by the House not only provides $700 billion for rescuing financial markets but extends billions more in tax breaks for renewable energy, businesses and middle class workers

  • Futures pointed to a higher open on Wall Street Friday after the September employment report showed payrolls were cut more than expected, something that is likely to ratchet up pressure on the House to pass the bailout bill when it votes later today.

  • Want graphic evidence of how confused traders are? Stock futures rallied for a couple minutes on the Wells Fargo/Wachovia deal, then quickly dropped. Futures dropped again as non-farm payrolls came out below expectations, then rallied back a few minutes later.

  • The latest overall job loss numbers showed a loss of 159,000 jobs in September while the unemployment rate remained at 6.1%, close to a five-year high.  This is the largest payroll drop since March 2003.  Here is a breakdown of where the job losses were as well as which sectors were adding jobs.

  • Though they were at the helm of companies that were bruised or broken by the credit crunch, these 12 CEOs were still offered fat severance packages when they were shown the door.Take a look at these subprime CEOs and their golden parachutes, including the one who apparently declined his multi-million dollar exit package. The packages include cash, benefits, stock options and other forms of compensation and based on company proxy statements.

    These 11 CEOs were the helm of companies that were bruised or broken by the credit crunch. Take a look at the money they had coming to them.

  • George Washington Bridge

    While regulators were sprinting to save the financial system last month, someone was making a lot of money — by betting against the State of New Jersey, the New York Times reported.

  • This once-great company now operates in some of the worst parts of the economy.

  • Stocks declined Thursday as dismal reports on factory orders and jobless claims piled on to a market already on edge about a freeze in the credit markets and the bailout bill as it heads to the House. GE was the biggest drag on the Dow.

  • Government Bailout

    The U.S. Senate passed a revised $700 billion bailout bill, breathing life back into closely watched legislation that supporters say will revive paralyzed credit markets.

  • Government Bailout

    The U.S. Senate passed a revised $700 billion bailout bill, breathing life back into closely watched legislation that supporters say will revive paralyzed credit markets.

  • Stocks ended lower Wednesday amid concerns about strained credit markets and the economic slowdown.  Banks rallied as investors were encouraged by progress on bailout talks on Capitol Hill.  GE got a vote of confidence -- to the tune of $3 billion -- from Warren Buffett.

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    As Congress tries again to pass a financial rescue plan, the question remains whether a bailout is actually needed—and if so, what are the options.

  • If some other recent offerings are any indication, this might be the time to buy.

  • GE's announcement of a $15 billion capital raise ($12 b in common, $3 b in preferred to Warren Buffett with a 10 percent dividend) is difficult news for shareholders, but everyone agrees that two things need to be done:

  • The New York Times can't seem to get enough of Cramer lately. Check it out.