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Stocks Citigroup Inc

  • Once more, it's the noise coming from Washington Wednesday that could drive markets. Hope that the bill would be resuscitated before the end of the week is sending stocks higher.

  • You know what? Hank Paulson may not be the most powerful financial person in the country right now. That honor goes to Sheila Bair, the chairman of the FDIC. In recent weeks, Ms. Bair has held the banking system together, coordinating smooth takeovers of distressed banks in deals run and controlled by her agency.

  • All major U.S. Indices end the third quarter on a historic note.  The Dow and S&P 500 had their fourth consecutive quarterly drop, tumbling 4.40% and 9.01% respectively.  The NASDAQ Composite fell the most among the major Indices for the quarter, down 9.19%.

  • Stocks rebounded Tuesday amid hope that Congress will regroup and find a way to approve a $700 billion bailout plan for banks which it rejected on Monday.  Financials rallied and Apple, one of the hardest hit techs on Monday, gained 4 percent.

  • A small but very vocal minority of the trading community continues to insist that the TARP bailout plan should not be passed. So what IS their plan?

  • Stocks rebounded Tuesday amid hope that Congress will regroup and find a way to approve a $700 billion bailout plan for banks which it rejected on Monday.  Financials rallied and Apple, one of the hardest hit techs on Monday, gained 4 percent.

  • Stocks opened higher Tuesday amid hope that Congress will regroup and find a way to approve a $700 billion bailout plan for banks which it rejected on Monday.

  • For a better understanding of the Wachovia/Citigroup deal and what is happening in the consumer banking arena, Bankrate.com spoke with Jim Eckenrode, banking and payments research executive at TowerGroup in Needham, Mass.

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    What is a regular investor to make of it all? What about people who have money in bank accounts? The New York Times provides some answers to questions that are probably on your mind.

  • Wall Street looked set to rally on Tuesday after having plunged the previous day, with investors still hoping Congress will find a way to approve a $700 billion bailout plan for banks which it rejected on Monday.

  • The rise in futures is welcome by those hostile to the bill, who argue that the market should go it alone. To purists, the collapse of bank prices simply means that more and more of the bad news is factored into the market.

  • Tuesday promises more treachery for investors as they navigate markets held captive by politicians and the promise of a rapidly faltering economy.

  • The House rejected the Wall Street bailout bill and the market screamed, selling off frantically until the Dow was left with its biggest one-day point drop ever. "This is panic and ... fear run amok," Zachary Karabell, president of River Twice Research told CNBC. "Right now we are in a classic moment of a financial meltdown," he said.

  • He told Mad Money viewers everything was OK. Two weeks later, his bank ceased to exist.

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    CNBC’s Steve Liesman is hearing the Federal Reserve will support "certain banks" to the bitter end.

  • Global Credit Crisis

    The credit markets were thrown into further turmoil Monday after the House rejected the government's proposed financial bailout plan

  • The market screamed as the House vote on the Wall Street bailout bill teetered on the edge of a cliff — and then fell off. At one point, the Dow was down more than 700 points -- its second biggest intraday move on record.

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    The government's failed rescue plan has heightened Wall Street's greatest malady right now: Fear.

  • Stocks fell sharply Monday as fear rippled through the market with cracks starting to show in the global financial system and a House vote on the Wall Street bailout bill due later today.

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    The government rescue plan may help cure some of the ills that are afflicting the banking industry, but it's unlikely to remedy Wall Street's greatest malady right now: Fear.