Stocks Citigroup Inc

  • Most of the 30 stocks in the Dow were higher Tuesday after billionaire investor Warren Buffett offered a reinsurance plan to troubled bond insurers and top mortgage lenders unveiled a plan aimed at freezing foreclosures.

  • Credit Suisse trimmed total writedowns from the subprime crisis Tuesday and its CEO Brady Dougan told CNBC he saw many growth opportunities for the bank.

  • Most of the 30 stocks in the Dow were higher Tuesday after billionaire investor Warren Buffett offered a reinsurance plan to troubled bond insurers and top mortgage lenders unveiled a plan aimed at freezing foreclosures.

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    Six top mortgage lenders launched a new program aimed at staving off foreclosure for seriously delinquent borrowers.

  • A home is advertised for sale at a foreclosure auction in Pasadena, California.

    As home prices fall and banks tighten lending standards, people with good, or prime, credit histories are falling behind on their payments for home loans, auto loans and credit cards at a quickening pace, according to industry data and economists.

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    The disclosure that losses from risky debt may be billions of dollars more than previously reported could eventually put CEO Martin Sullivan's job in jeopardy, people within the company told CNBC.

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    Six of the largest U.S. mortgage lenders will announce on Tuesday a program to identify seriously delinquent borrowers and halt any foreclosure process.

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    Financial regulators and central bankers delivered a grim assessment of the credit market upheaval on Saturday, warning that worse may lie ahead as banks tighten lending and an economic slowdown spreads.

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    In Tomorrow's Playbook we look at next weeks Yahoo! board meeting, the G7 summit in Tokyo and drug earnings. Find out how to trade it all!

  • China Investment Corporation (CIC), the Chinese sovereign wealth fund, is near a deal with  private equity group JC Flowers to put about $4 billion into a new fund to invest in ailing financial institutions, the Financial Times reported.

  • Germany's Deutsche Bank reported better-than-expected fourth-quarter earnings Thursday, with smaller quarterly writedowns related to credit and subprime losses.

  • Cisco's downbeat earnings comments could make a dent in stocks Thursday morning. Ahead of the opening bell, investors will also be watching rate meetings by the European Central Bank and the Bank of England.

  • While housing pulls down the rest of the market, Mike Farrell's pulling in profits. Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • European shares managed to end a volatile session in positive territory Wednesday, having followed U.S. stocks higher and gained from bullish utilities and telecom stocks.

  • Recession fears shook the markets Tuesday and credit jitters will likely continue to trouble stocks Wednesday.

  • Federal Reserve Bank Chairman Ben Bernanke

    If the health of the economy is so murky, why has the Federal Reserve been so aggressive in cutting interest rates?

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    Amid all the market volatility recently, some important buyers have been stepping up to the plate. How can you can profit from their moves?

  • To date 291 (just under 60%) of the S&P 500 companies have reported earnings. Here's a look at which companies have had the biggest surprises so far...

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    Most Americans don’t know the difference between "monoline" and "mononucleosis." Suddenly we’re told the fate of capitalism rests on saving teetering monoline bond insurers from losing their AAA credit ratings. Today I report on how this all relates to you.

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    Corporate America is pouring money into the U.S. presidential campaign at an unprecedented rate, with a torrent of donations coming from the businesses behind the subprime mortgage crisis.