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  • Investment managers have herded Americans into dividend-paying stocks and Treasurys as Europe's debt crisis grips the world. Mark Schultz, in contrast, says now's the time to take advantage of the low prices of companies with plenty of room to grow.

  • CBS

    Cable hasn't killed broadcast television, which is still drawing viewers and advertisers with some help from an unlikely ally — the DVR, CBS Chief Executive Les Moonves told CNBC Tuesday.

  • CBS CEO Talks Business

    Shares of CBS are up more than 30% so far this year, with CNBC's David Faber, and Les Moonves, CBS CEO.

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    As more readers switch to e-books, publishers are releasing print books with design elements emphasizing the physical beauty of the old-fashioned hard copy, the New York Times reports.

  • watching_tv_200.jpg

    The "November Sweeps" period -- when ratings set local affiliates ad rates -- ends Wednesday. But this year the buzz on Madison Avenue is about how little sweeps matter. Yes, local affiliates still certainly matter -- they account for north of $20 billion in advertising revenue, with just under $10 billion of that based on sweeps, according to Horizon Media's Brad Adgate. But, with the growth of cable, not to mention the impact of DVRs, logging real-time viewing in a Nielsen diary seems antiquated.

  • Model Erin Heatherton walks the runway

    The annual Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show is an event fans look forward to each year, but it has usually been focused on aspiration and brand building — until now. As Limited Brands, the retailer’s parent, gears up for the holiday season, it is planning more promotional events around the fashion show, which airs Nov. 29 on CBS.

  • CBS delivered some monster TV ratings in college football over the weekend, and now the bulls are tuning in for a rally.

  • David Einhorn, president of Greenlight Capital Inc., speaks at the Value Investing Congress in New York.

    David Einhorn, who famously bet on the demise of Lehman Brothers, is betting on the comeback of two American icons: General Motors and CBS.

  • Most likely outcome of the Greek confidence vote: An interim government that immediately approves the EU package. The most pressing issue is money — Greece has run out. They need the 8 billion euros ($11 billion) from the troika fast. If they don't clearly approve the European Union package, they don't get the money, which means they will face an immediate crisis even before they are able to hold an election.

  • Futures extended their gains in volatile pre-market trading Thursday after the ECB unexpectedly cut its interest rate and following talks the Greek government might collapse, thus avoiding a referendum on its euro zone membership and easing concerns about an imminent default.

  • "Even though MTV made many strategic mistakes during the book’s span, from its 1981 launch through its first decade, they were still, at every turn, smarter than the record labels, whose relationship with MTV passed through four distinct phases, all of them unwise," writes the co-author of the new book, "I Want My MTV."

  • Netflix

    On Thursday, Netflix announced it inked a deal for shows from the CW network. This new content, bolstering the streaming service's TV library, will draw a key younger demographic to Netflix while paying CW's parents, CBS and Warner Brothers, up to $1 billion dollars over ten years.

  • For many people, a first job is an entry-level position whose greatest form of payment is experience. People taking these jobs have to slowly climb the ladder and prove themselves before they can earn better money. They have to pay their dues.For professional athletes, there is no entry-level job--they’re put on the field on day one and expected to deliver the goods. Rookie athletes are well-compensated for this, and for many sports fans, the players’ salaries and contracts are almost as fascina

    Check out our list of rookie athletes who received huge paydays to play for major league teams!

  • Techcrunch

    Like newspapers, portals like AOL and Yahoo are confronting the cold fact that there is less general interest in general interest news. Readers have peeled off into verticals of information — TMZ for gossip, Politico for politics and Deadspin for sports, and so on. The New York Times reports.

  • Texas A&M Aggies vs. Montana State Bobcats college football game at Kyle Field

    There's been much talk about the SEC's television contracts and how the addition of Texas A&M would change the conference. If the conference is different, even by one member, the thinking goes that the SEC could re-open its television deals with CBS and ESPN, deals that were signed in 2009 and now seem to be below market value. But adding A&M won't mean that CBS and ESPN will automatically have to pay more than the $825 million and the $2.25 billion they respectively agreed to pay for 15 years of rights. Why? Because there's already protections in its current contract.

  • Find out the name Fast trader Patty Edwards thinks is the best way to find shelter in this economic storm.

  • Here's our Fast Money Final Trade. Our gang gives you tomorrow's best trades, right now!

  • Amid weak economic data and advertising sales, media companies are looking for additional sources of revenue to supplement lagging advertising sales. Because CBS relies heavily on advertising revenue, its stock may have hit its peak, one analyst said—but another analyst is still long on the media giant.

  • How should you trade CBS earnings, a big Walmart downgrade and the latest sales data from Ford.  Get the word on the Street, here!

  • CBS Kicks Off Media Earnings

    A look at after hours action of CBS following its earnings report, with the Fast Money traders.