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  • Facebook

    CNBC's John Carney and Business Insider's Joe Weisenthal discuss Facebook's IPO filing.

  • New England Patriots fans wait in line to pick up their Super Bowl tickets at Gillette Stadium.

    ConvergExMarket Group’s Nicholas Colas takes an annual look at “Super Bowl economics” to get a peek into the mind of the luxury consumer and this year there is very little inflation in ticket prices. What gives?

  • sign_way_out_200.jpg

    Changes at the top at some big tech companies over the past four months—including Research In Motion on Sunday—have some traders thinking about other underperforming giants that could use a new leader.

  • Google, Facebook, and Wikipedia did a brilliant job rallying millions of their users to oppose anti-piracy legislation being debated in Congress. It worked. In the wake of massive outcry that dominated the Internet and media on Wednesday, congressional leaders are sending the bill back to the drawing board.

  • market-insider-stocks-to-watch-200.jpg

    Take a look at some of Thursday morning's early movers:

  • WNBC's Jonathan Dienst reports seven people have been charged in a nearly $62 million insiders trading scheme; eBay shares soar on earnings news; AT&T is raising prices for data plans; and two dozen people are still unaccounted for in the deadly Costa Concordia cruise disaster.

  • Trading eBay's Earnings & Semiconductors

    Discussing the trade on eBay's better-than-expected Q4 earnings, with the Fast Money traders, and Frederick Moran, Benchmark Company analyst, weighs in with the outlook for the internet company. Also the after hours trade on Xilinx, and Linear Tech.

  • ebay_HQ1.jpg

    The online retailer reported quarterly earnings of 60 cents a share on revenue of $3.4 billion, topping analyst expectations. However, the company’s outlook fell short. The stock wavered in after-hours trading.

  • Stocks closed near highs of the session Wednesday with the S&P finishing at its highest level since July 2011, buoyed by an optimistic report on Greece, which added fuel to an earlier rally after a better-than-expected housing market report.

  • The Wikipedia website has shut down its English language service for 24 hours in protest over the US anti-piracy laws.

    The battle over Internet piracy bills, soon to be voted on in Congress,  has reached a fever pitch, drawing a web-wide protest, and fierce opposition from the tech industry, among others involved in online  business, the New York Times reports.

  • Stock index futures cut their gains to turn flat Wednesday following a handful of tepid economic news and amid fears over the ongoing European debt crisis, but Goldman Sachs earnings helped limit losses.

  • Of all the earnings reports coming this week, we’re hearing eBay may warrant close attention.

  • Map of Silicon Valley

    The start-up boom means there are more freshly minted millionaires looking to manage their wealth. And Wall Street firms are happy to help, for a fee. The New York times reports.

  • It's already up 8% this month; why are Jon Najarian, Steve Grasso and top tech analyst Colin Gillis so bullish on Microsoft ahead of earnings?

  • market-insider-stocks-to-watch-200.jpg

    Take a look at some of Monday morning's early movers:

  • The Dow and S&P clawed back into positive territory at the close Wednesday, adding to the sharp rally from the previous session, but gains were limited over renewed fears over the euro zone debt crisis.

  • The exterior of Yahoo! corporate headquarters in Santa Clara, California.

    Yahoo confirmed it is tapping Scott Thompson, president of eBay's PayPal division, as its new CEO.

  • Futures pulled back Wednesday, after a strong start to the New Year, as investors turned their focus once again to the euro zone's debt concerns.

  • Amazon.com

    If you want exposure to the ongoing migration from brick-and-mortar retailers and toward online retailing, it may be wiser to seek out more attractively valued names other than Amazon.com.

  • Close up of someone typing on a laptop.

    Shopping while drinking has long benefited high-end specialty retailers; now the popularity of Internet sales has opened alcohol-induced buying to the masses, the New York Times reports.