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Stocks Ford Motor Co

  • Toyota.

    When the Toyota first announced a safety alert, two questions crossed my mind. First, how serious is this problem to fix? Second, how much will this stain Toyota's sterling reputation?

  • Less than two months after GM and eBay hooked up to try online sales of new cars in California, CNBC has learned the program will end as scheduled tomorrow.

  • Hyundai

    Hyundai is picking up market share here in the U.S. thanks to a potent combination of much better product (both in terms of quality and styling) and savvy marketing. A company that was once dismissed as weak imitator of the Japanese automakers is now taking it to the folks from Toyota, Nissan, and Honda.

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  • Stocks fell for a third straight session Friday as disappointing reports on new-home sales and durable-goods orders offset an uptick in consumer sentiment.

  • The falling US dollar is expected to get even weaker, moving to the center of a carry trade and encouraging global investors to borrow more dollars to fund higher-yielding currencies and assets. Is this necessarily a bad thing and does this mean the dollar will become the new yen? Peter Schiff, president of Euro Pacific Capital shared his thoughts.

  • Almost two weeks into its campaign offering buyers of GM vehicles their money back if they are not satisfied, Bob Lutz likes what he is seeing. In fact, the Vice-Chairman is so confident the program will work, he is predicting fewer than 1% of those who buy a Chevy, Buick, Cadillac and GMC under this promotion will ask for their money back.

  • Stocks tried to claw higher Friday but struggled as disappointing reports on new-home sales and durable-goods orders offset and uptick in consumer sentiment.

  • Microsoft Windows party

    Microsoft, in its latest attempt at a campy viral marketing campaign, is trying to get everyday users to throw a "House Party" (think Tupperware party) to spread the word to their friends about the upcoming Windows 7. Yeah, never put the geeks in charge of the party.

  • Wall Street's September rally has moved to the sidelines, at least for now, with stocks posting modest losses in each of the last two sessions.

  • chrysler_grill.jpg

    After 3 months of kicking the tires and looking under the hood at Chrysler, CEO Sergio Marchionne is about to roll his game plan for fixing the troubled American auto maker.

  • Stocks fell for a second day Thursday after the Federal Reserve announced plans to start unwinding some stimulus measures and a report showed existing-home sales fell last month.

  • Ford Sign

    Ford Motor is increasing its focus on the fast-growing car markets of the Asia-Pacific region, executives said Wednesday as they rolled out a new small car in India, says the New York Times.

  • The Carbon Challenge

    The potential economic impact of a carbon market seems to divide American industry as much as talk about healthcare reform may divide a family at Sunday dinner.

  • Stocks retreated Thursday after the Federal Reserve announced plans to start unwinding some stimulus measures and a report showed existing-home sales fell last month.

  • An opening pop fizzled Thursday after the Federal Reserve announced plans to start unwinding some stimulus measures and a report showed existing-home sales fell last month. Stocks had opened higher after a report showed an unexpected drop in jobless claims last week.

  • As IPO's go, A123 has elicited a fair amount of discussion, much of it boiling down to this question: Is buying into the promise of the Massachusetts-based battery maker the same as buying into the hype that surrounded ethanol related stocks a few years back?

  • A total of 483 U.S companies have raised $150 billion via sales of common stock or convertible securities so far this year according to Trim Tabs, an outfit that follows such stuff. The pace has increased recently since in the first quarter only $13.8 billion of paper had been sold.

  • The Fed is reportedly considering using reverse repurchase agreements in order to withdraw a part of the $1 trillion it pumped into the economy. What will this mean for the markets? Art Cashin, director of floor operations at UBS Financial Services, offered CNBC his insights.

  • Stocks ended lower Wednesday as the rally after the Federal Reserve's statement faded and investors began to worry that the central bank is inching closer to withdrawing stimulus measures that have propped up the economy. The Dow had briefly popped above 9,900.