Stocks Ford Motor Co

  • Stocks declined on Wednesday as bank shares continued to struggle and retail sales unexpectedly fell for a second straight month. Some analysts said these fits and starts are just the market cooling down, after a runup of 30 percent since its 12-year low in early March. Read and listen to what the experts had to say... (UPDATED)

  • Considering stocks have posted their biggest three day drop since March is this a signal to sell or a second chance to buy?

  • In time, markets will go higher — but there’s going to be a "vicious correction" along the way, said Doug Kass of Seabreeze Partners. Read his "Miley Cyrus" recovery theory.

  • GM Dealership

    They are in the crosshairs of the auto task and passionate about their feelings over GM and Chrysler plans to drop dealers. What's interesting is that not all dealers are against the idea of trimming the dealer ranks, while others are fearing the end of business' that have been in their family for years.

  • With a sideways market yesterday (Tuesday), what do traders expect today? Art Cashin, UBS Financial Services director of floor operations, offered CNBC his stock-market insights on Wednesday.

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    For auto dealers, this may go down as the worst week ever. GM will announce plans to cut 2600 dealerships while Chrysler drops roughly 850. That's roughly 42% of the GM dealerships and 27% of the Chrysler stores going away.

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    Here's our Fast Money Final Trade. Our gang gives you tomorrow's best trades, right now!

  • Auto worker works on assembly line at GM Lansing Grand River plant.

    Investors dumped shares of both Ford Motor and General Motors on Tuesday, with GM hitting its lowest level since the Great Depression.

  • Stocks closed positive as consumer and health care stocks rose, though weakness in technology and banks prevented larger gains. Banks again were in focus as major institutions reacted to stress test results released last week. Read and listen to what the experts had to say...

  • The New York Stock Exchange, downtown Manhattan.

    Stocks lost ground in afternoon trading but traded in a fairly tight range, though the Nasdaq posted losses approaching 1.5 percent.

  • Cramer gives his perspective on the slew of secondary offerings, why bad news for Google’s radio advertising venture isn’t necessarily bad news for the company, and how to play Ford’s big secondary offering.

  • General Motors

    It's kind of like watching a car crash. You know it's sad. You know it's awful. But you can't stop looking at it. I'm not trying to be trivial about the plunge in GM shares this week.

  • Stocks opened slightly higher, bouncing off a rough day Monday but moving hesitantly as an economic report showed consumer weakness continues to hamper growth.

  • It's true, as Lowry noted this morning, that "it's probably still too early to declare the long-awaited short-term correction has arrived." But technicians will be watching internals very careful in the next couple days for a bigger pullback on an increase in volume.

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    Since President Barack Obama's election in November, followed by the passage of a new U.S. economic stimulus package, and China's own stimulus plan, the tech, consumer discretionary, materials and telecom sectors have all had positive gains.  Here are some of the biggest winners.

  • Empty GM Dealership

    For months we've all heard the warnings. If GM and Chrysler go bankrupt it will trigger a host of other bankruptcies from suppliers to dealers.

  • Stocks are poised for a rebound at the start Tuesday, with investors dipping back into stock index futures following Monday's sharp declines.

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    The fact Toyota posted it's first annual loss in 75 years is not surprising- almost every auto maker lost money this year. The fact this company lost $6.9 Billion in the quarter ending this March is staggering, but not so out of line that people are shocked. What is surprising is Toyota CEO Katsuaki Watanabe telling reporters in Tokyo his company was "lacking in the scope and speed of dealing with various issues."

  • wind_turbine_upclose.jpg

    Unsatisfied with the auto industry, many companies have have their traded auto-related business for a niche in wind-power.

  • Plus, Cramer talks credit cards, banks and CEOs.