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Stocks Ford Motor Co

  • Stocks closed positive as consumer and health care stocks rose, though weakness in technology and banks prevented larger gains. Banks again were in focus as major institutions reacted to stress test results released last week. Read and listen to what the experts had to say...

  • The New York Stock Exchange, downtown Manhattan.

    Stocks lost ground in afternoon trading but traded in a fairly tight range, though the Nasdaq posted losses approaching 1.5 percent.

  • Cramer gives his perspective on the slew of secondary offerings, why bad news for Google’s radio advertising venture isn’t necessarily bad news for the company, and how to play Ford’s big secondary offering.

  • General Motors

    It's kind of like watching a car crash. You know it's sad. You know it's awful. But you can't stop looking at it. I'm not trying to be trivial about the plunge in GM shares this week.

  • Stocks opened slightly higher, bouncing off a rough day Monday but moving hesitantly as an economic report showed consumer weakness continues to hamper growth.

  • It's true, as Lowry noted this morning, that "it's probably still too early to declare the long-awaited short-term correction has arrived." But technicians will be watching internals very careful in the next couple days for a bigger pullback on an increase in volume.

  • bull_global_300.jpg

    Since President Barack Obama's election in November, followed by the passage of a new U.S. economic stimulus package, and China's own stimulus plan, the tech, consumer discretionary, materials and telecom sectors have all had positive gains.  Here are some of the biggest winners.

  • Empty GM Dealership

    For months we've all heard the warnings. If GM and Chrysler go bankrupt it will trigger a host of other bankruptcies from suppliers to dealers.

  • Stocks are poised for a rebound at the start Tuesday, with investors dipping back into stock index futures following Monday's sharp declines.

  • toyota_logo.jpg

    The fact Toyota posted it's first annual loss in 75 years is not surprising- almost every auto maker lost money this year. The fact this company lost $6.9 Billion in the quarter ending this March is staggering, but not so out of line that people are shocked. What is surprising is Toyota CEO Katsuaki Watanabe telling reporters in Tokyo his company was "lacking in the scope and speed of dealing with various issues."

  • wind_turbine_upclose.jpg

    Unsatisfied with the auto industry, many companies have have their traded auto-related business for a niche in wind-power.

  • Plus, Cramer talks credit cards, banks and CEOs.

  • As of yesterday, over 80% of the S&P 500 companies have reported earnings.  Here's a look at which companies have had the biggest surprises so far...

  • General Motors logo

    When you burn through $113 Million every day, it seems ludicrous to say that the quarter turned out a little better than expected. Equally disturbing is the fact few will seem phased by the fact spent $113 Million more than it took in every single day of the first quarter.

  • Wall Street and the entire nation will be watching GM on Thursday. The auto giant reports earnings, and many wonder, will it be their last before bankruptcy?

  • Stocks traded higher on Wednesday on two economic reports that showed unemployment rates beginning to ease. Optimistic experts told investors to start getting into the market again. Watch and listen to what the pros had to say...

  • We can make money by selling small cars in U.S. with our new global platform, said Alan Mulally, Ford Motor CEO.

  • Stocks opened higher Wednesday and the S&P 500 (as of this writing) is positive again for 2009. Will it hold? Arthur Cashin, UBS Financial Services director of floor operations, offered his insights to CNBC.

  • Ford

    This is for all of you who have complained, groused, wondered, and offered pointed opinions about the Big 3 not being committed to smaller, greener cars. For those of you who have scoffed at the idea of Detroit making money on compact cars built in the U.S., Ford believes it will prove you wrong.

  • 2007 Chrysler 300

    As the bankruptcy hearings about creating a new Chrysler pick up steam in New York, it's becoming crystal clear how quickly the Federal Government wants to re-structure the ailing auto maker.