Stocks Fifth Third Bancorp

  • Stocks sold off in the final hour of trading, an hour that has become known for wild, unpredictable swings, as a new government plan to juice money-market funds and some dismal corporate outlooks kept investors on edge.

  • Stocks retreated after a fleeting uptick as investors digested a slew of earnings and some dismal outlooks and signs of a thawing in the credit markets.

  • Stocks turned lower again after paring most of their losses amid more signs of thawing in the seized up credit markets.

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    U.S. companies ranging from chemicals like Du Pont, to pharmas like Pfizer and Schering Plough, and financials like Fifth Third and BlackRock, reported earnings Tuesday.

  • In a step that could accelerate a shakeout of the nation’s banks, the Treasury Department hopes to spur a new round of mergers by steering some of the money in its $250 billion rescue package to banks that are willing to buy weaker rivals, according to government officials.

  • U.S. stock market index futures pointed to a lower open for Wall Street Tuesday as worries over the health of the economy offset enthusiasm after news of a possible second stimulus package.

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    Following are the “Fast & Furious” trades - hot ways to play next week's market moving events.

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    Bank stocks soared on Tuesday after the government introduced details of its plan to inject $250 billion into the battered sector.

  • The House rejected the Wall Street bailout bill and the market screamed, selling off frantically until the Dow was left with its biggest one-day point drop ever. "This is panic and ... fear run amok," Zachary Karabell, president of River Twice Research told CNBC. "Right now we are in a classic moment of a financial meltdown," he said.

  • The market screamed as the House vote on the Wall Street bailout bill teetered on the edge of a cliff — and then fell off. At one point, the Dow was down more than 700 points -- its second biggest intraday move on record.

  • Stocks fell sharply Monday as fear rippled through the market with cracks starting to show in the global financial system and a House vote on the Wall Street bailout bill due later today.

  • Stocks fell sharply Monday as fear rippled through the market with cracks starting to show in the global financial system and a House vote on the Wall Street bailout bill due later today.

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    Shares of Wachovia and National City tumbled on worries about heavy mortgage losses, as talks on a $700 billion financial sector bailout bogged down and regulators seized Washington Mutual in the largest bank failure in U.S. history.

  • Some interesting intelligence from one of the ground zeroes of the housing market: Florida. Paul Miller of FBR published some financial “ramblings” (his word not mine) on a recent trip to Florida’s West Coast.

  • Following are the day’s biggest winners and losers. Find out why shares of Fossil and Newmont Mining popped while China Mobile and Fifth Third Bancorp dropped.

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    Qualifying rounds - Final: After a week of ups and downs, we are now up to the medal round.  The playing field has been narrowed from twenty countries to ten.  And the winners are...

  • Philip Duff of Duff Capital Advisors offers CNBC the hedge-fund view of where Merrill Lynch, regional banks, the markets and oil are headed.

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    In an election year, there is a lot of talk about flip flops.  If you want to see some real reversals, take a look at the markets.  Energy, which is the leading sector over the past six months, is now the worst performing sector while Financials have moved from the cellar to the penthouse in the same period.

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    The Dow closed with triple digit gains on Tuesday largely due to a $3 slide in oil and the positive sentiment created by bank earnings. What's the "Word on the Street?"

  • Fifth Third Bancorp, a large Midwest bank, on Tuesday posted a second-quarter loss due to rising charges related to the tax treatment of leveraged leases and higher credit costs.