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Stocks Federal National Mortgage Association

  • Inflation isn't the problem, Cramer said, it's deflation. Maybe the Fed should visit a trading desk for some perspective.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • U.S. stocks powered to a sharply higher close in a volatile final hour of trading after the markets were roiled by rumors and comments from President Bush. "The rollercoaster ride is not over yet," said Stuart Schweitzer at JP Morgan Private Bank. "I think we're in the fourth inning on subprime and credit-related issues, but this economy is resilient."

  • Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson told CNBC that the U.S. economy remains healthy but troubles in the housing market may take some time to play out. Paulson also said he was not concerned with a recent report suggesting China may retaliate economically if the U.S. imposes trade sanctions to force a revaluation of the yuan.

  • Bernanke and company didn't cut rates like Cramer wanted, but they showed they're not asleep at the wheel. Here is the Mad Money take on it.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • U.S. mortgage roadkill is fresh and ripe for the picking.  Countrywide Financial demonstrated that on Tuesday when it announced plans to buy five retail mortgage branches from HomeBanc, which is exiting the business after its stock was delisted last week for trading around 30 cents a share.

  • A rebound in the financial sector and positive earnings surprises triggered gains for some of the most actively traded stocks on Tuesday.

  • Cramer is done being negative. An all-out economic crisis stemming from the mortgage meltdown can be avoided. Here's what he thinks the Fed can do to start.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • The Bernanke Fed is being put to its first big test as Fed watchers monitor its handling of the credit drama when it releases its statement at 2:15 p.m. The Fed's one day meeting is not expected to end with any adjustment in rates, but traders are hoping for a tweaking of the Fed statement with language that will soothe some of the anxiety about mortgage and credit markets.

  • Shares of Fannie Mae  and Freddie Mac, the largest providers of money for U.S. home mortgages, jumped as much as 10 percent on Monday on speculation that regulatory restrictions limiting the size of their portfolios might be lifted.

  • Corporate news and analyst upgrades were some of the catalysts behind the most actively traded stocks on Monday.

  • A number of U.S. states are setting up funds to help homeowners with risky subprime mortgages refinance to more affordable loans in a bid to slow the rate of home foreclosures, the Wall Street Journal reported on its Web site.

  • Sterling Bancorp, Jones Soda and more...Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Cramer has a special, 500th episode pick - a company that's part-financial, part-government agency and totally committed to shareholders. Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • AirTran, Fannie Mae, Tesco and more...Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • The moves by the two government-sponsored companies, the biggest buyers and guarantors of home mortgages in the country, came in response to the turmoil in the market for so-called subprime mortgages, higher-priced loans for people with tarnished credit or low incomes who are considered greater risks.

  • The U.S. government agency that oversees mortgage finance providers Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac said both companies were adequately capitalized as of Dec. 31, 2006.

  • If the subprime default mess weren't enough, get ready for the sequel in the Alt-A market. Pundits say so-called “no-doc” or “liar loans -- popular among housing bubble speculators -- will bring another spate of defaults.

  • Whodunit? Amid events like the NYSE's suspension of trade in New Century Financial shares, the subprime mortgage sector is in trouble -- and some are blaming the Federal Reserve. Rick Antonoff, partner at Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman, took on CNBC's Steve Liesman to debate the question.

  • Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke urged Congress on Tuesday to bolster regulation of mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and suggested limiting their massive holdings to guard against any danger their debt poses to the overall economy.

  • Fannie Mae will not pay $44.4 million budgeted for executives who led the mortgage finance company during years of faulty accounting, the company said in a regulatory filing on Tuesday.