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  • Stocks ended a topsy-turvy session higher as investors juggled a profit warning from Bank of America and some dismal economic news with optimism over the Obama stimulus plan.

  • Stocks were on their way back up again as investors shrugged of some disappointing economic data and kept an optimistic outlook about President-elect Obama's economic-stimulus plan.

  • Stocks pared their gains Tuesday after a reports showed pending-home sales and factory orders declined, while a measure of the service sector unexpectedly improved.

  • Tatsuya Mizuno, director of corporates at Fitch Ratings, predicts that the global automobile industry will remain weak for another two to three years. But he sees one somewhat bright spot amid the sector gloom.

  • Toyota Dealership

    As I was watching the dismal auto sales numbers come in on Monday, I was waiting for somebody to drop me an e-mail and sarcastically remind me that it was just a few months ago when I said, "Things can't get much worse in the auto industry."

  • Stocks were poised to rebound slightly Tuesday, as investors waited for some more data on the broader economy due shortly after the start of trading.

  • Google? No. Microsoft? Nope. Apple! Actually, no. It's Hewlett-Packard. Find out why big money managers will be buying this stock over the rest.

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    The S&P fell on Monday with investors taking profits after last week's run-up; also concerns about slowing cell phone sales hit shares of the biggest telecommunications companies.

  • Stocks snapped a three-day winning streak Monday as traders cashed in some of their chips from last week's rally following some dismal reports on the telecom and financial sectors.

  • Stocks turned mixed Monday, the second day of trading in the new year, as a construction report came in much better than expected, as did U.S. auto sales. Stocks started off the day sharply lower as investors cashed in some of their chips after last week's rally that pushed the Dow up more than 6 percent and past the key 9,000 mark.

  • Markets are off their lows on discussion about the fiscal stimulus bill. The stimulus bill will be heavier on tax cuts than expected.

  • Stocks declined Monday, the second day of trading in the new year, after a rally last week that pushed the Dow up more than 6 percent and past the key 9,000 mark. A report that showed construction spending fell by half of what was expected helped shave some of the loss.

  • GM Dealership

    For all the hand wringing you see from people wondering if GM and Chrysler can get the UAW to re-work wages and benefits or for debt holders to agree on a debt for equity swap, the real trick will be closing dealerships.

  • We begin the "real" New Year with stocks at a 6-week high, and the S&P 500 24 percent above its November 20 low. Now let's see if we can change leadership: health care and consumer stocks have generally outperformed in the past few weeks, though recently industrial stocks have improved. A shift toward less defensive names would be a welcome development.

  • Wall Street looked set to open lower in the second day of trading of the year after Friday's rebound, with investors expected to take some profits following the Dow's rise to more than 9,000.

  • Stocks rebounded Friday as investors displayed some optimism for the new year, scooping up bargains in the consumer discretionary and energy sectors. The Dow ended above 9,000 for the first time since early November.

  • Stocks skidded as the unraveling of one of the biggest deals this year overshadowed gains in the energy sector.

  • Stocks rebounded Friday, pushing the Dow above the key 9,000 mark as investors rang in the new year with optimism, scooping up bargains.

  • European shares are up 2% despite some bleak economic reports out of the U.K. today. A survey performed by the country’s largest mortgage lender showed home prices plunged 16% in the fourth quarter from a year ago. That was the sharpest decline in at least 25 years.

  • Stocks rebounded Friday, led by consumer discretionary and energy, after a quick dip triggered by an ISM report that showed manufacturing activity at a 28-year low.