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  • Stocks shot up Tuesday after the Federal Reserve dramatically cut interest rates.

  • Stocks rose Tuesday, even after dismal reports on CPI and housing starts, as investors hope for new direction from the Federal Reserve when the central bank delivers its decision on interest rates today.

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    With the Fed's key rate dropping closer to zero, the central bank is moving into uncharted territory. Still, Fed Chairman Bernanke has made it clear the Fed isn't running out of ammunition yet.

  • Big 3 Bailout

    With the film strip of our lives playing out as we buy, sell, curse, and embrace our cars, it's no wonder we are passionate about what we want to see happen to the Big 3. But here's the problem: few of us seem willing to accept the other side is saying stuff that may have some merits.

  • The Consumer Price Index had its biggest one month drop ever.  Here is a breakdown of the inflation benchmark to show you where costs are falling most.

  • The New York Stock Exchange, downtown Manhattan.

    Stocks closed lower amid worries about bank earnings and weak consumer spending on tech.

  • BYD's F3DM electric car as shown on the Chinese company's web site bydauto.com

    A Chinese-made electric car, backed by Warren Buffett, has been officially introduced to the retail market in that country.  The plug-in was scheduled to be sold in the U.S. and Europe starting in 2010, but Reuters quotes BYD Chairman Wang Chuan Fu as telling reporters those plans have been delayed one year to 2011.

  • General Motors

    As Detroit waits to see how much financial help it will get from the White House and how that aid will be structured, we keep hearing one thing over and over. The Bush administration wants to avoid a "disorderly bankruptcy" in the auto industry. This is not good news for GM and Chrysler.

  • U.S. stock index futures were mixed as contradictory information on a bailout package for troubled automakers were making investors nervous.

  • Even the worst of news couldn't jolt investors Friday. Here's what it means for the market.

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    Do you think allowing the auto companies to go bankrupt would cripple the US economy?

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    The Dow rose on Friday on hopes that a lifeline for struggling U.S. automakers could still materialize...

  • Stocks ended higher Friday after a topsy-turvy day of wondering if auto makers would get a bailout or face bankruptcy.

  • If even one of the Big Three goes bankrupt, many of the already struggling auto suppliers will fail, said Wilbur Ross, WL Ross & Co. chairman & CEO of the company.

  • Most on Wall Street expected Dow declines worth a few hundred points, but that didn't happen. So what's going on?

  • Stocks traded mixed after the Treasury offered to help prop up the auto makers after the Senate rejected the $14 billion bailout passed by the House.

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    Polls show Americans split on bailing out the U.S. automakers, a highly visible troubled sector in a country grappling with recession. Melvyn W. writes, "They must not be bailed out...

  • If you have a choice, staying away from bankrupt retailers is a good idea.

  • This week brought a slew of layoffs, including Dow component Bank of America, which said its planned job cuts may grow to 35,000 over three years after it completes its purchase of Merrill Lynch.

  • First, there's the question of how much money is really needed. The bill would have allotted $14 billion in loans, but most think the amount needed to avoid imminent bankruptcy is smaller, probably in the $5-10 billion range. This makes it doable using some combination of government guarantee and, perhaps, private lending.