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Stocks General Motors Co

  • As Citi trades below $1, speculation again heats up that Citi, Bank of America and GM will almost certainly be removed from the Dow Industrials. Lists are being circulated for likely candidates.

  • Stocks opened lower Thursday, pressured by doubts about whether General Motors can survive and ahead of a hearing with Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner.

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    General Motors' auditors have raised "substantial doubt" about the troubled automaker's ability to continue operations, and the company said it may have to seek bankruptcy protection if it can't execute a huge restructuring plan.

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    General Motors' says it gave Chief Executive Rick Wagoner compensation valued at $14.9 million last year for leading a company that lost $30.9 billion and is running on government loans. 

  • Stocks opened lower Thursday, pressured by doubts about whether General Motors can survive and ahead of a hearing with Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner.

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    Admit it. When you see the headlines of GM warning it could be forced into chapter 7 bankruptcy and liquidate, you likely have two reactions. First, you say "Duh! These guys have been hanging on by a thread, of course they could go under."

  • US stocks headed for a lower open Thursday, having clawed back key ground in the previous session, ahead of a hearing with Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and decisions by the European Central Bank and the Bank of England on interest rates.

  • No additional stimulus from China? The Street was excited yesterday on talk that China would announce additional stimulus measures today, but the Chinese premier did not offer any additional stimulus details during the opening session of the National People's Congress.

  • Stocks rebounded off of 12-year lows Wednesday after the Obama administration launched its mortgage-rescue plan to help millions of struggling homeowners stay in their homes. The market shrugged off a bleak beige-book report and barreled higher in afternoon trading.

  • Stocks rebounded off of 12-year lows Wednesday after the Obama administration launched its mortgage-rescue plan to help millions of struggling homeowners stay in their homes. The market shrugged off a bleak beige-book report and barreled higher in afternoon trading.

  • Stocks rebounded off of 12-year lows Wednesday after the Obama administration launched its mortgage-rescue plan to help millions of struggling homeowners stay in their homes.

  • At the risk of redundancy I'll ask it again: Is he? Is President Obama effin' CRAZY? President Obama blames the continuing global financial crisis for the unmitigated carnage on Monday, when the Dow fell below 7000 and closed down 300 points (or 4.2%) at a 12-year low of 6763.

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    The number of job cuts continued to soar in February 2009, reflecting the worsening US recession.

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    After years of getting into the habit of buying or leasing a new car every 3 or 4 years, or even going one step further and buying a third car for a house with only two drivers, Americans are pulling back.

  • Two months into the year, the average dividend yield of the Dow 30 has continued to rise since the start of 2009, despite some significant dividend cuts like those from CNBC parent, General Electric.  See how the 30 companies in the Dow compare.

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    More companies announced layoffs this week as the employment picture continued to dim. JPMorgan Chase and Chesapeake Energy were among the latest names on Thursday to announce job cuts.

  • US stocks index futures made a tentative push higher ahead of the open Wednesday as investors braced for the latest round of economic data and looked for direction from Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner.

  • If Press Secretary Robert Gibbs needs proof that President Obama's spending plans are hurting the markets, then he should look at the Dow. Or the S&P 500. Or the Nasdaq...

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    Stocks fell in volatile trading on Tuesday, with the S&P ending below 700 for the first time since October 1996

  • Stocks ended a yo-yo session lower Tuesday, with the S&P ending a few points below the 700 mark as investors remained on edge.