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  • The Dow chart looked like a yo-yo Thursday as traders pounded financials including Freddie Mac and Lehman Brothers, overshadowing any positive news the market had to offer.

  • General Motors Chairman and Chief Executive Rick Wagoner.

    The message from General Motors chairman and CEO was clear and direct: The company has no plans to cut anymore of its brands. I asked Wagoner about cutting the brands when I caught up with him after a speech here in Dallas.

  • Stocks flipped and somersaulted Thursday as investors juggled worries about capital constraints at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac with a drop in jobless claims, merger activity and encouraging retail sales.

  • On Mad Money we pander to neither panic nor euphoria. On Tuesday, an up day, Jim urged everyone to get out of the financials. I can't emphasize how important it is that we go negative on up days, but history can. The 234 point rout yesterday afternoon is a pure example of what I'm talking about. We try not to be too down on down days, and emphasize extreme caution on up days because that's useful.

  • General Motors Chairman and Chief Executive Rick Wagoner.

    General Motors is developing plans to cut costs and improve its "cash and funding position," Chief Executive Rick Wagoner said in an e-mail to the automaker's managers and team leaders.

  • solar_panels_3.jpg

    A Michigan company will provide the solar electric system for what it says will be the world’s largest rooftop array, on a General Motors assembly plant in Zaragoza, Spain, according to the New York Times.

  • General Motors Headquarters

    After blogging yesterday about the latest discussion at General Motors about keeping/selling/killing some of it's eight brands, I was inundated with e-mails suggesting what GM should do.

  • Following are the day’s biggest winners and losers. Find out why shares of General Motors and Dryships popped while Teva and RBS dropped.

  • 2008 Saturn Aura

    General Motors may get rid of some brands, speed the introduction of small cars from other markets and make further white-collar job cuts as it tries to deal with a shrinking U.S. auto market.

  • Stocks moved out of bear territory Monday as oil retreated more than $4 a barrel, easing inflation fears, and technology got a boost from two of its largest companies.

  • Commodities are a bit weaker here as the dollar is stronger, stock futures are flat. Europe and Asia are mostly higher, the Shanghai Composite, however, is up 4.6 percent today, best day in a month on strong earnings forecast from a couple of their banks.

  • 2008 Buick Enclave

    As GM slogs through a summer of sickening sales, there's growing speculation GM CEO Rick Wagoner will do an about face and finally cut some of the automaker's brands in an effort to stop the bleeding.

  • GM logo, General Motors logo

    No. 1 U.S. automaker General Motors is planning to cut thousands of white-collar jobs and is considering whether it should sell or stop production of more of its brands, The Wall Street Journal said, citing people familiar with the matter.

  • Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

    The week was a mixed bag of economic and market news, most of it on the negative side.  Oil prices continued to hit record highs, the market officially entered bear territory and the European Central Bank socked it to the U.S. by raising rates a quarter-point.  Despite all of this, CNBC guests found bright spots in steel, financials, tech and international stocks.

  • For the short Independence week ending Friday, July 3, 2008, the U.S. Markets ended the week in bear market territory with the Dow and the NASDAQ off more than 20% from their market peak set in October, 2007.

  • Stocks enjoyed an upbeat session after a not-horrible jobs report but both the Dow and Nasdaq ended the holiday-shortened week in bear-market territory.

  • Stocks opened higher Thursday as the market breathed a collective sigh of relief that the June job loss wasn't worse than expected.

  • Stocks opened higher Thursday as the market breathed a collective sigh of relief that the June job loss wasn't worse than expected.

  • GM logo, General Motors logo

    Just when you think, "How much worse can it get for General Motors, along comes a day like yesterday. When Merrill Lynch downgraded the stock and said "bankruptcy is not an impossibility" for the automaker what was already a horrific slide became even worse.

  • As bears lay claim to Wall Street, it's the European Central Bank that will be a big factor in the stock market's next moves.