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Stocks Goldman Sachs Group Inc

  • As US corporations continue to report better than expected earnings for Q3, it's hard not to be upbeat and positive on the outlook for the stock market.

  • Kenneth R. Feinberg, the Treasury Department's special appointee for executive compensation.

    Kenneth R. Feinberg may succeed in trimming back executive pay, but only shareholders can curtail greed in the corner offices, reports the NYT.

  • CIT Group inc.

    CIT Group, struggling to restructure billions in debt and stay out of bankruptcy court, could finalize a deal in the next 24 hours with Wall Street bank Goldman Sachs over a disputed payment on a $3 billion loan, according to a published report.

  • Traders at the New York Stock Exchange.

    Ahead of Friday's opening bell, investors will be watching earnings from Microsoft and Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke's address at the Boston Fed's annual conference.

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    The importance of strong leadership can’t be understated. Here are a few of the business world’s best bosses.

  • As the government outlines plans to slash pay at Bank of America, Citigroup and other banks, will top talent run for the exits and drag down shares in the process?

  • After hours, shares of Amazon surged as much as 11% after the company released earnings. Even at these levels, Joe Terranova says it's a stock to own going forward!

  • Today is the biggest earnings day of the season and as of this afternoon, just over 30% of the S&P 500 companies have reported earnings.  Here's a look at which companies have had the biggest surprises so far...

  • As stocks search for direction, the traders are closely watching the action in Goldman. What does it signal into the close?

  • If the market continues at its current pace since the March lows, it could hit 1,280 on the S&P by the end of the year, said Laszlo Birinyi Jr., president of Birinyi Associates. He shared his market insights.

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    Those who protest these limits on executive compensation are pushing back by arguing that top talent at the 7 firms will flee to Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan or hedge funds that have no limit on executive compensation. So what?

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    The weakening dollar has been one of the catalysts driving stocks and other risk assets higher, and it is a main focus of traders this week as they sort through a deluge of corporate earnings news and watch the dollar shrink to a 14-month low.

  • Here's our Fast Money Final Trade. Our gang gives you tomorrow's best trades, right now!

  • Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner said that the Obama administration will end some of the TARP programs by the New Year. What does this mean for the financial sector? Mark Lane, equity research analyst at William Blair & Co. and Fred Cannon, co-director of research and chief equity strategist at KBW shared their insights.

  • Traders at the New York Stock Exchange.

    Stocks could trade a bit choppy Wednesday, as investors react to a tidal wave of earnings news and watch fluctuations in the dollar and other risk assets.

  • A New York Stock Exchange trader.

    After six quarters of bare-bones survival, companies are once again trying to live up to whisper-number expectations that are influencing the market's reaction to earnings numbers

  • This earnings season, traders want to see more than an earnings beat due to cost-cutting measures. They want to see an improvement or beat in revenue as well, signaling that business is growing again.

  • Why does the momentum of this market rebound continue to confound some of the Street's most credible strategists?

  • President Barack Obama

    The Wall Street giants that received a financial lifeline from Washington may have no compunction about paying big bonuses to their dealmakers and traders. But their willingness to deliver “thank you” gifts to President Obama and the Democrats is another question altogether.

  • Dick Fuld

    In the summer of 2008, two months before Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy, Richard S. Fuld Jr., the firm's chairman, was continuing his desperate efforts to find a lifeline. They had begun in March, shortly after the demise of Bear Stearns, when Mr. Fuld called the legendary investor Warren E. Buffett seeking a capital infusion, to no avail. Lehman had raised money elsewhere, but that didn't help for long, and its condition again was worsening.