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Stocks Goldman Sachs Group Inc

  • Stocks ended mixed in a dramatic finish Monday as the market was buzzing about President Obama's press conference on the economy tomorrow.

  • The pros showed lots of caution as the markets move deeper into earnings season, suspecting pullbacks after several strong weeks.  Financials earnings will be of particular interest this week, but surprises are less likely.  When the U. S. economy recovers, it is likely to do so before those of either Japan or Europe, because the U.S. has acted much more swiftly, forcefully, and, one hopes, appropriately.

  • Stocks retreated Monday after a five-week rally as investors braced for this week's round of earnings and a potential bankruptcy filing by General Motors.

  • Stocks, which had already been coming off their mid-morning lows, rallied further about 1:18 ET when it was announced that President Obama would make a major address on the U.S. economy tomorrow.

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    Get the latest plays from the Fast Money traders while the market is open. Guy Adami talks banks, Tim Seymour is watching the car companies and much, much, more!

  • As Earnings Season gets further underway, analysts continue to revise their estimates for the First Quarter downward.  Data from Thomson Reuters shows that year over year EPS growth numbers from last April are now expected to fall 37.8% compared to an expected drop of 12.5% at the start of the year.

  • Stocks retreated Monday after a five-week rally as investors braced for this week's round of earnings and a potential bankruptcy filing by General Motors.

  • Abby Joseph Cohen, Goldman Sachs Global Markets Institute president, offered CNBC her onsights on the economy and the markets.

  • Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, Citigroup and our parent General Electric report earnings this week. Goldman Sachs rumors of a secondary are rampant ahead of the earnings report tomorrow

  • Stocks looked set to fall at the start of trading Monday, with the Treasury Department instructing Dow component General Motors to prepare a contingency plan for bankruptcy.

  • Wall Street

    The turning point for Stephan Jung came in February, around the time bonus checks were slashed. A veteran of UBS, one of many banks tarnished by the financial crisis, Mr. Jung realized that the old Wall Street would not be bouncing back any time soon.

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    With earnings season in full swing, here are next week's trades -- brought to you today by the Fast Money Four.

  • Though they unveiled it three weeks ago to resounding applause on Wall Street, the administration's plan is a Rube Goldberg machine gone awry —too clever and convoluted, rife with potential for chicanery and favoritism.

  • With Goldman, JPMorgan and Citigroup set to report earnings next week, how should you trade?

  • Do Pres. Obama and Treasury man Geithner want to control the banks, just as they have taken over GM? Will the government assert political direction of the financial system in place of market forces, or in place of the rule of law as enforced by bankruptcy judges?

  • Plus, Cramer explains why Cisco's next year be on the bullish side of the spectrum.

  • A CEO apologizing? It happened one and a half times today. Emerson Electric's CEO apologized for misjudging the size of the sales drop and Goldman Sachs CEO said that the economic crisis had been "deeply humbling," which itself was an extraordinary admission.

  • CNBC reporter and Trader Talk blogger Bob Pisani reports again from the New York Stock Exchange, noonday Tuesday. Pisani says "Wall Street" is watching financials with a keen eye, as earnings season gets underway. He reports that traders believe credit will continue to deteriorate through the second and third quarter.

  • LLoyd Blankfein testifying before House Financial Services Committee

    The chief executive of Goldman Sachs said the economic crisis has been "deeply humbling" for financial firms, and that banks receiving taxpayer money need to pay back the funds as soon as possible.

  • Banks were hurt by a recent report by Mike Mayo, Cramer tells you why you should pay no attention to it, and points out the best and the worst in the sector.