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    The US financial bailout plan, widely seen as inflationary, is boosting commodity prices.

  • Stocks declined Monday as investors have begun to realize that, despite the government bailout, there's more pain to come.

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    Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley are changing their status to bank holding companies which will allow them to create commercial banks that will be able to take deposits...

  • Stocks opened lower Monday as Friday's euphoria cooled with investors realizing that financial woes could go on for quite some time and a fresh wave of new developments emerged.

  • Today's current crisis is not so much about credit as it is about liquidity, according to billionaire investor Wilbur Ross.

  • US stock index futures were lower ahead of the open on Monday, as Friday's euphoria cooled with investors realizing banks are still facing severe hits to balance sheet valuations and limited future earnings despite a financial bailout plan from the government.

  • US stock index futures were lower ahead of the open on Monday, as Friday's euphoria cooled with investors realizing banks are still facing severe hits to balance sheet valuations and limited future earnings despite a financial bailout plan from the government.

  • WALL STREET IN CRISIS - A CNBC SPECIAL REPORT

    The decision of Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs to become bank-holding companies will not mean any change in their investment banking and trading operations, according to a top industry analyst

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    Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley will change their status to bank holding companies,  allowing them to take deposits and bolster their capital.  This means a future of stricter regulation, less leverage and probably lower returns.

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    The chances of a Morgan-Wachovia deal diminishes considerably if the Fed declares Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs commercial banks, meaning that the Fed will backstop all collateral on their books.

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    The  last two major investment banks—Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley—will change their status to bank holding companies,  allowing them to take deposits and bolter their capital.

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    The chances of a Morgan-Wachovia deal diminishes considerably if the Fed declares Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs commercial banks, meaning that the Fed will backstop all collateral on their books.

  • Plus, Cramer clarifies Thursday's call on Goldman Sachs and more.

  • For the historic week ending Friday, September 19, 2008,  the major U.S. Indices managed to close mixed and almost flat after one of the most volatile trading weeks ever, driven by the collapse of investment bank, Lehman Brothers, enormous government actions around the globe, and billion dollar deal making.  In one week, the government bailed out AIG, pumped funds into money markets, and banned short selling of financials - all while keeping the Fed Funds target unchanged and taking unprecedented actions to halt the liquidity crisis.  The CBOE Volatility Index (VIX) surpassed the benchmark level of 30, hitting an intraday high of 42.16 on Thursday, its highest level since 10/2002.    The major indices were all up and down +/- 3% for 4 of the past 5 days.  The Dow posted a 2 day point move of more than 778 points as of Friday’s close, after plummeting 811 between Monday and Wednesday and hitting 10,609.66, its lowest level since 11/9/2005.  On Friday, The Nasdaq Composite recorded a 2-day point move of greater than 175 points after it closed down 109.05 points on Wednesday, its first triple digit decline for one day since it began trading after the 9/11 attacks.  The S&P 500 flirted with record territory closing up 98.7 over the last two days, marking its biggest 2-day point move since 3/16/2000, the largest 2-day point move ever.

  • This week's wild ride on Wall Street literally mimicked a rollercoaster ride: a couple of stomach-turning drops before coasting to the end and dropping you off exactly where you started.  After being down by nearly 1000 points at Wednesday's close, the Dow clawed back those 1000 points in the following two days leaving the blue-chip index off just about 40 points from where it ended last Friday!

  • Several companies with large operations in the financial services sector are looking to be added to the government's list of stocks that cannot be sold short.

  • WALL STREET IN CRISIS - A CNBC SPECIAL REPORT

    Officials of Morgan Stanley are quoted as saying Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson's plan to tackle the financial crisis gripping the country is a potential "game-changer."

  • This week's wild ride on Wall Street is starting to look like just that — a ride — because the Dow is on track to end roughly where it was last Friday.

  • General Electric is expected to be added to a list of financial stocks that can no longer be sold short, according to people familiar with the situation.

  • Stocks shot out of the gate like a rocket Friday after the Federal Reserve, Treasury and SEC jumped in to triage the meltdown in the banking system with measures including a ban on short selling in financials.  The Dow jumped more than 300 points higher at the open.  Brokerages and banks roared higher, with Goldman Sachs, Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley, Wachovia and Washington Mutual all up more than 30 percent.