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Goldman Sachs Group Inc

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  • Activity in the options market may be signaling another major selloff in financial shares. Implied volatility, a component of how options are priced, rises as market makers anticipate greater swings in the actual shares tied to a put or a call.  For names caught up in the recent market turmoil implied volatility has skyrocketed.

  • Sudden Death Tuesday, 14 Aug 2007 | 10:21 AM ET

    Goldman Sachs and TBS International...Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • U.S. stocks closed little-changed amid investor concerns that more credit troubles may be down the road. "I think there's still a lot of convincing to do to investors that things are going to work out fairly well," said Sam Stovall, chief investment strategist at Standard & Poor's.

  • Financial stocks staged a mild recovery on Monday, but the rebound didn't encourage options speculators to make bullish bets on the sector.

  • Goldman Sachs said Monday it doesn't plan to unwind two hedge funds - its Global Alpha and North American Equity Opportunities funds - following losses the funds have suffered amid recent market volatility.

  • CNBC's Domm: Today's Agenda in the Markets Monday, 13 Aug 2007 | 10:21 AM ET

    Stocks start the week on firmer ground after central bankers once again pumped cash into the markets, injecting confidence and liquidity. Stock markets around the globe gained, and U.S. stock futures are higher.

  • The Federal Reserve may be politically hampered in requesting a currency swap with the European Central Bank even if such a move could help relieve a squeeze in money markets, said analysts at Wrightson ICAP in a note to clients on Monday.

  • The Week on Wall Street: Rally To Rout Friday, 10 Aug 2007 | 5:00 PM ET

    So much for an early week rally. Stocks plunged Thursday and remained vulnerable on Friday as worries about the subprime lending mess got the attention of central bankers and investors alike.

  • SEC Examines Wall Street Books for Subprime Losses Friday, 10 Aug 2007 | 10:50 AM ET

    U.S. regulators are scrutinizing the books of Wall Street's largest investment banks amid questions they are hiding losses from subprime mortgages, people familiar with the inquiry said.

  • Sell Block Thursday, 9 Aug 2007 | 8:03 PM ET

    Today's 387-point drop in the Dow is a perfect reason why investors should take profits when they have the chance. Remember: Bulls make money, bears make money, but hogs get slaughtered.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • U.S. Stocks ended sharply lower on renewed fears about credit markets and global liquidity. "The message of the markets today is that the credit problem is significantly more than what was being forecast or expected by private sector economists and the Federal Reserve," said Hugh Johnson of  Johnson Illington Advisors. "This sharp decline is very scary."

  • Winners & Losers: Financials Slide, Housing Bounces Thursday, 9 Aug 2007 | 4:32 PM ET

    Financial stocks got hammered again on Thursday as renewed credit worries scared investors away from the sector.  Housing stocks, however, showed surprising strength even with the growing problems in the subprime mortgage market.

  • Goldman Sachs Pounded by Hedge Fund Rumors Thursday, 9 Aug 2007 | 3:30 PM ET

    Goldman Sachs Group, known for its Midas touch, again found itself on the defensive Thursday amid speculation that two of its hedge funds had fallen sharply in recent weeks and were selling down positions.

  • Crazy Finish But Comeback Continues Thursday, 9 Aug 2007 | 10:48 AM ET

    Wednesday was a crazy day for the markets, but when all was said and done The Dow finished 150 points higher and Blackstone (BX) formed the largest buyout fund ever. Is a steady comeback building this week for stocks? Here's the word on The Street.

  • Dow Closes With Triple-Digit Gain in Volatile Final Hour Wednesday, 8 Aug 2007 | 11:01 PM ET

    U.S. stocks powered to a sharply higher close in a volatile final hour of trading after the markets were roiled by rumors and comments from President Bush. "The rollercoaster ride is not over yet," said Stuart Schweitzer at JP Morgan Private Bank. "I think we're in the fourth inning on subprime and credit-related issues, but this economy is resilient."

  • Homebuilding stocks continue to rebound from 52-week lows carved out last week while tech investors were encouraged by a number of favorable earnings reports and brightening sentiment.

  • Thinking Positive: What the Market Can Do Tuesday, 7 Aug 2007 | 10:26 AM ET

    If the government doesn't help, the private sector still has some tricks up its sleeve. Cramer has outlined five things that the market can do that he thinks will circumvent a complete systemic breakdown.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Mad Money Mortgage Madness Index Monday, 6 Aug 2007 | 10:32 AM ET

    There’s no place for bullishness until this mortgage/private-equity mess gets stabilized. But when will investors know that happened? Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Gov. Jon Corzine of New Jersey

    I had an interesting lunch in Washington yesterday with Gov. Jon Corzine of New Jersey, thankfully on the mend after his horrendous auto accident earlier this year. It was all the more interesting for the fact that I had interviewed his sort-of political neighbor, Rudy Giuliani, two days before. Corzine sharply disputed Giuliani's assessment of several economic issues. That's not surprising, since Corzine is a liberal Democrat who supports Hillary Clinton for president and Giuliani is seeking the Republican nomination.

  • A second day of stock market advances sizzled at the open, but then faded.  Some strategists are concerned that momentum could easily wane if those who bought on the rebound Monday opt to book fast profits and sell into strength.